Revolutionary Britannia?: Reflections on the Threat of Revolution in Britain, 1789-1848

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Manchester University Press, 2000 - History - 214 pages
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For two generations following the overthrow of the absolutist monarchy in France in 1789 until the revolution of 1848, political upheaval broke out across Europe--except, it seems, in Britain. Why? For a century historians dismissed revolutionary outbursts as mere economic protest or the work of trouble-makers. This book takes the full measure of protest and revolution in England, from the Jacobins of the 1790s and the Luddites of 1812 to the Chartists of 1839-48. Royle challenges the assertion that "Britain was different," drawing on recent research to show how the revolutionaries were defeated by government propaganda and the strength of popular conservatism.
  

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Contents

Sedition and treason 17921820
13
Revolution or reform 183032
67
Chartism 18378
92
Why was there no revolution?
139
The cohesion of social welfare
158
The authority of the law
172
Conclusion
189
Index
204
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About the author (2000)

Edward Royle is Professor of History at the University of York.

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