Travels Through Cyprus, Syria, and Palestine; with a General History of the Levant. Translated from the Italian, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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P. Byrne, 1792 - Middle East
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Page 358 - Jesus, Master, it is good for us to be here, and let us make three tabernacles, one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias, not knowing what he said.
Page 114 - Chriltians, has produced a number of perfonages celebrated for their knowledge and the íaoátity of their lives. In the neighbourhood there are feveral copper mines, which the Turks have been forced to abandon. The following lines, in the tenth book of Ovid's Metamorphofes, prove that they •were known in the time of...
Page 207 - ... at four precifely. On the third day it begins as before ; but it falls an hour later. On the five...
Page 2 - It was anciently known by many different names, both among poets and hiftorians ; the former of whom made it the birth-place of Venus, and the abode of the Graces. This ifland contained formerly nine kingdoms, tributary to Egypt, and foon after to the Romans. From the emperors of the Weft it palled to thofe of the Eaft ; but was taken from them by the Arabs, under the reign of Heraclius.
Page 8 - ... sandals, which serve them for shoes. They have no stays ; a plain vest of cotton marks out their shape, and preserves the pliableness of the body. Over the whole is thrown a very fine shift or...
Page 61 - ... pursued, and while the former made a thousand turnings in order to escape, she every where found an opponent ; she, however, often defeated the greyhounds, and I admired in such cases the sagacity of these animals, who disdaining the assistance of those that were young and inexperienced, waited until some of the cunning old ones opened the way for them ; and then the whole plain was in motion. When the poor animal was just ready to become a prey to its enemy, the governor rushed forward, and...
Page 7 - European ladies have no occafion to be proud of the comparifon ; for there are few of them remarkable for their beauty. They are pretty tall, of a very amorous difpofition, have little tafte for induftry, and feem much inclined to indolence and voluptuoufnefs.
Page 349 - It is pretended that he came thither more than once with his difciples to eat. The inhabitants of Nazareth pay it a kind of worfhip, by burning perfumes and incenfe around it. At the diftance of a mile from the city, on the fouthern fide, is a mountain, which the Arabs call Zein, and the Nazarenes the Mountain of the Precipice, becaufe the Jews wifhed to precipitate the Meffiah from it.
Page 8 - Icfs delicate and tranfparent. Around their necks they have gold chains, and their arms are ornamented with jewels and pearls. Their head-drefs is an...
Page 67 - The moft beautiful edifice here" is, without doubt, the church of St. Sophia, where the kings of Cyprus were formerly crowned. It is built in the Gothic ftyle, and confifts of three large naves.

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