The annals of Yorkshire from the earliest period to the present time, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Crosby, 1851 - Yorkshire (England)
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Page 151 - I would not have your Majesty's two legs for your three kingdoms"— which freedom lost the king's favour, and no intercession could ever recover it.
Page 114 - He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul. All the images of nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily : when he describes anything, you more than see it, you feel it too.
Page 271 - College, the President of the College of Physicians, the Treasurer of Lincoln's Inn, the Master of the Charterhouse, and the Governors of Greenwich and Chelsea Hospitals.
Page 192 - Nothing could stop that astonishing infantry. No sudden burst of undisciplined valour, no nervous enthusiasm weakened the stability of their order ; their flashing eyes were bent on the dark columns...
Page 380 - To correspond with agricultural, horticultural, and other scientific societies, both at home and abroad, and to select from such correspondence all information which, according to the opinion of the Society, may be likely...
Page 258 - ... board or more in distinct black letters on a white ground, or white letters on a black ground, or by the same being printed in, legible characters on paper affixed to such board, and by such board being exhibited in some conspicuous place on the stations or places where such tolls shall be made payable.
Page 404 - There was a strong smell of vinegar and camphor. The corpse was beautiful and perfect. The hands and nails were very fine. I moved and bent every finger. I never saw so fine a set of teeth in my life. A young lady, a fellow prisoner, wished much to have a tooth ; I tried to get one out for her, but could not, they were so firmly fixed. The feet also were very beautiful. The face and cheeks were just as if he were alive. I .rolled his eyes : the eye-balls were perfectly firm under my finger.
Page 405 - Arctic, we found the air so cold, that our men being grievously pinched with the same, complained of the extremity thereof; and the further we went, the more the cold increased upon us. Whereupon we thought it best for that time to seek the land, and did so; finding it not mountainous, but low plain land, till we came within 38 degrees towards the line.
Page 191 - Suddenly and sternly recovering, they closed on their terrible enemies, and then was seen with what a strength and majesty the British soldier fights. In vain did Soult, by voice and gesture, animate his Frenchmen ; in vain did the hardiest veterans, extricating themselves from the crowded columns, sacrifice their lives to gain time for the mass to open out on such a fair field ; in vain did the mass itself bear up, and fiercely striving, fire indiscriminately...
Page 142 - This pillar was set up in perpetual remembrance of the most dreadful burning of this protestant city, begun and carried on by the treachery and malice of the popish faction, in the beginning of September, in the year of our Lord 1666. In order to the carrying on their horrid plot for extirpating the protestant religion and old English liberty, and introducing popery and slavery.

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