A classical and archŠological dictionary of the manners, customs, laws, institutions, arts, &c. of the celebrated nations of antiquity, and of the middle ages. To which is prefixed, A synoptical and chronological view of ancient history (Google eBook)

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Page 229 - Literature, science, taste, were words little in use during the ages which we are contemplating; or if they occur at any time, eminence in them is ascribed to persons and productions so contemptible, that it appears their true import was little understood. Persons of the highest rank, and in the most eminent stations, could not read or write. Many of the clergy did not understand the breviary which they were obliged daily to recite ; some of them could scarcely read it.
Page 84 - But at the distance of twenty-five years, I can neither forget nor express the strong emotions which agitated my mind as I first approached and entered the eternal city. After a sleepless night, I trod, with a lofty step, the ruins of the Forum ; each memorable spot where Romulus stood, or Tully spoke, or Caesar fell, was at once present to my eye ; and several days of intoxication were lost or enjoyed before I could descend to a cool and minute investigation.
Page 445 - ... so much boasted of by the ancients. It is but just to remark and esteem the noble genius which the Egyptians had for architecture ; a genius that prompted them from the earliest times, and before they could have any models to imitate, to aim in all things at the grand and magnificent; and to be intent on real beauties without deviating in the least from a noble simplicity, in which the highest perfection of the art consists.
Page 155 - ... that of the walls of the city. The ascent was from terrace to terrace by stairs ten feet wide. The whole pile was sustained by vast arches raised upon other arches, one above another, and strengthened by a wall, surrounding it on every side, of twenty-two feet in thickness.
Page 300 - There was a time in which there existed nothing but darkness and an abyss of waters, wherein resided most hideous beings, which were produced of a two-fold principle. There appeared men, some of whom were furnished with two wings, others with four, and with two faces. They had one body, but two heads : the one that of a man, the other of a woman : and likewise in their several organs both male and female. Other human figures were to be seen with the legs and horns of goats ; some had horses...
Page 300 - All things being in this situation, Belus came and cut the woman asunder ; and of one half of her he formed the earth, and of the other half the heavens ; and at the same time destroyed the animals within her, or, in the abyss.
Page 104 - Tenants by Copy of Court Roll, according to the Custom of the Manor...
Page 230 - First of all, the wilde heades of the parish flocking togither, chuse them a graund captaine of mischiefe, whom they innoble with the title of Lord of Misrule; and him they crowne with great solemnity, and adopt for their king. This king annoynted chooseth forth twentie, fourty, threescore, or an hundred lustie guttes, like to himself, to waite upon his lordly majesty, and to guarde his noble person. Then every one of these men he investeth with his liveries of greene, yellow, or some other light...
Page 35 - Basilciis : it was his office to keep good order, and to remove all causes of quarrel in the families of those who were dedicated to the service of the gods. The profane and the impious were brought before his tribunal ; and he offered public sacrifices for the good of the state. He assisted at the celebration of the Eleusinian festivals and other religious ceremonies.
Page 61 - The bridge was not inferior to any of the other buildings, either in beauty or magnificence ; it was a furlong in length,* and thirty feet in breadth, built with wonderful art, to supply" the defect of a foundation in the bottom of the river, which was ╗II sandy.

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