Chronicle of the Maya Kings and Queens: Deciphering the Dynasties of the Ancient Maya

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Thames & Hudson, 2000 - Social Science - 240 pages
5 Reviews
Behind the vast, ruined cities lying desolate in the rainforests of Central America lie the turbulent stories of the Maya monarchy, stories brought vividly to life in Chronicle of the Maya Kings and Queens, the first book ever to examine in one volume the greatest of the Maya dynasties. Describing many of their own discoveries, two of the world’s leading experts in Maya hieroglyphic decipherment take the reader into a once-hidden history. In chapters on the eleven most important kingdoms, they set out the latest thinking on the nature of Maya divine kingship, statehood and political authority, and describe all the most recent archaeological finds. With biographical accounts of 152 kings and four ruling queens - including royal names in hieroglyphs, datafiles listing lineage, spouses and children, and place of burial - and numerous special features, 'Chronicle of the Maya Kings and Queens' combines ground-breaking research with a highly readable history, offering readers a front-row seat in one of the most exciting arenas of world archaeology.

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Review: Chronicle of the Maya Kings and Queens: Deciphering the Dynasties of the Ancient Maya

User Review  - HM - Goodreads

This book is chock full of site plans and photos, artifacts and loads of maps. This is a highly informative work considering that most of Maya history comes from the Glyphs/writing left on buildings ... Read full review

Review: Chronicle of the Maya Kings and Queens: Deciphering the Dynasties of the Ancient Maya

User Review  - Leonide Martin - Goodreads

Well-documented descriptions of the ruling dynasties of 11 Maya cities. Nice overview of Maya time periods, hieroglyphs, calendars, culture and politics. Published in 2000, the name spellings are from ... Read full review

About the author (2000)

Simon Martin is an Honorary Research Fellow at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.

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