Industrialization of Indigenous Fermented Foods, Revised and Expanded

Front Cover
Keith Steinkraus
CRC Press, Mar 26, 2004 - Technology & Engineering - 600 pages
1 Review
Industrialization of Indigenous Fermented Foods, Second Edition presents the most recent innovations in the processing of a wide range of indigenous fermented foods ranging from soy sauce to African mageu. It serves as the only comprehensive review of indigenous fermented food manufacture from ancient production methods to industrialized processing technologies for clear understanding of the impact of fermented food products on the nutritional needs of communities around the world.

Provides authoritative studies from more than 24 internationally recognized professionals on various processing and control technologies, biochemical and microbiological information, and manufacturing and production procedures form the United States, Indonesia, and Western Europe.


About the Author
Keith H. Steinkraus is a Professor Emeritus of Microbiology and Food Science at Cornwall University in Geneva and Ithaca, New York, USA. He is the author or editor of numerous professional publications including the Handbook of Indigenous Fermented Foods. He is a Fellow of the International Academy of Food Science and Technology, the Institute of Food Technologists, the American Academy of Microbiology, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
  

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Contents

Industrialization of Fermented Soy Sauce Production Centering Around Japanese Shoyu
1
II History
2
III Present Soy Sauce Situation
11
IV Change of Soy Sauce Manufacturing Methods from Indigenous to Modern Processing
31
V Microbiology and Biochemistry
48
VI Application of New Biotechnology for Soy Sauce Manufacture
80
VII Forecast
88
Industrialization of Japanese Miso Fermentation
99
XII Contrast between Indigenous and Modern Processing
508
XIII Critical Steps in Manufacture
511
XIV Major Problems in Industrialization
514
XV Optimum Environmental Conditions for Fermentation
515
XVI Microorganisms Essential for Fermentation
521
XVII Storage of Gari
523
XVIII Microorganisms that Cause Spoilage
525
XIX ChemicalBiochemical Changes in Substrate
528

II History and Earliest Known References to Miso
100
Raw Materials Used in Ancient Times
103
IV IndustrialCommercial Production Today
105
V Contrast Between Indigenous and Modern Processing
115
VI Critical Steps in ManufactureFermentation
122
VIII Optimal Environmental Conditions for Microorganism
124
IX Essential Microorganism for Fermentation
125
X Possible Spoilage Microorganism
126
XI ChemicalBiochemical Changes in Miso During Fermentation
127
XII Changes in Physiological Functions During Fermentation
137
XIII Forecast of the Role Miso in the Future References
141
References
142
Industrialization of Sake Manufacture
149
II Production and Consumption
153
III Manufacture of Sake
156
IV Conclusion
187
References
188
Industrialization of Japanese Natto
193
II Production and Consumption
203
III The Fermentation and Consumption
204
IV Materials Used for Traditional and Modern Natto Production
205
VI Change from Traditional to Modern Manufacturing Process
218
VII Critical Steps in the Manufacture and Fermentation of Natto
223
VIII Important Problems in the Industrialization
224
IX Optimum Conditions for Fermentation
226
X Microbiology and Biotechnology
228
XI Other Aspects of the Microbiology of Natto
231
XII Chemical and Biochemical Changes During Fermentation
232
XIII Starter Cultures
235
References
238
Tapai Processing in Malaysia A Technology in Transition
247
II Earliest Known References
248
III Substrates
249
Microorganism that Cause Spoilage
252
VII Traditional Methods of Preparation
253
VIII Preparation Method by Small Industry
254
IX Contrast Between Indigenous and Modern Processing
255
X Critical Steps in Processing Tapai
259
XII Optimum Fermentation Conditions
266
XIII ChemicalBiochemical Changes
267
XIV Changes in Nutritive Value
268
References
269
Industrialization of Africas Indigenous Beer Brewing
271
II Evolution of the Brewing Process
283
III Biochemistry and Microbiology of Brewing and Malting
326
IV Prospects for the Future
348
References
352
Industrialization of Mageu Fermentation in South Africa
363
II Contribution to the Diet
364
III Annual Production and Consumption
365
IV Historical Background
366
V Substrates
367
VI Mageu Production in Ancient Times and as a Cottage Industry
368
VII Industrial Production
369
VIII Indigenous Versus Modern Processing
382
IX Critical Steps in ManufacturingFermentation
387
X Major Problems in Industrialization
388
XI Optimal Environmental Conditions for Fermentation
390
XII Essential Microorganism for Fermentation
392
XIII Microorganism that Cause Spoilage
395
XIV ChemicalBiochemical Changes in Substrates During Fermentation
397
XV Nutritive Value and General Composition of Mageu
400
XVI Future Role of Mageu as a Food
402
XVII Mageu Fermentation in the Future
404
References
405
Industrialization of Ogi Fermentation
409
II Consumption in the Diet
410
III Importance in the Diet
411
IV Total Production
412
VI Substrates Used
413
VIII CottageVillage Methods
417
IX IndustrialCommercial Ogi Production
420
X Contrast Between Indigenous and Modern Processing
436
XI Critical Steps in ManufacturingFermentation
438
XII Major Problems in Industrialization
442
XIII Optimal Environmental Conditions
444
XIV Microorganisms Essential to Fermentation
445
XV Microorganisms that Cause Spoilage
449
XVI ChemicalBiochemical Changes in the Substrate
451
XVII Nutritive Value Changes
457
XVIII Forecast
464
XIX Contribution to New International Industry
466
Industrialization of Gari Fermentation
471
II Contribution to the Diet
474
III Per Capita Consumption
476
IV Early Reference to Gari
478
VI Production in Ancient Times
479
VII Production in VillageCottage Industry
482
VIII Method of Consumption
483
IX IndustrialCommercial Production
487
X Nigerian Standard for Gari
504
XI Raw Materials Storage
506
XX Nutritive Value of Gari
533
XXI Forecast
540
XXII Contribution to New International Industries
541
References
542
Industrialization of Mexican Pulque
547
II Production and Consumption
549
Earliest References
554
IV Outline of Essential Steps in Fermentation
556
V Indigenous Fermentation of Pulque Using Raw Materials in Ancient Times and Today
557
VI Modernization of Pulque Processing Methods
560
VII Changes from Indigenous to Modern Processing
563
VIII Critical Steps in ManufacturingFermentation
564
IX Major Problems in Industrialization
565
X Microbiology and Biochemistry of Fermentation
567
XI Optimum Fermentation Conditions
569
XII Possible Spoilage Microorganism
570
XIII Chemical and Biochemical Changes During Fermentation
571
XIV Starter Culture
573
XV Effect of Processing on Nutritive Value
574
XVI Application of New Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering to Fermentation
577
XVII Forecast for Future Fermentation
580
References
582
Industrialization of Tempe Fermentation
587
II Production and Consumption
588
III History of Tempe
593
IV Outline of Essential Steps in Fermentation
594
Raw Materials Used in Ancient Times and Today
599
VI Modern Industrial and Commercial Processing Methods
605
VII Changes from Indigenous to Modern Processing Methods
607
VIII Major Problems in Industrialization
620
IX Microbiology and Biochemistry of Fermentation
622
X Optimum Fermentation Conditions
624
XI Biochemical Changes During Fermentation
625
XII Starter Culture
628
XIII Effect of Processing on Nutritive Value
629
XIV Forecast for Future Fermentation
630
References
631
Tempe Production in Japan
637
II Starters for Tempe Production
638
III Tempe Rhizopus Is Derived from Hibiscus
639
IV Production of Tempe
641
V Nutrition and Secondary Processing of Tempe
643
VI Future of Tempe in Japan
644
Industrialization of Thai Fish Sauce Nam Pla
647
II History
648
III Production and Consumption
649
IV Raw Materials
652
V Indigenous Process
655
VI Modern Industrial Processing
657
VII Microbiology
670
VIII Chemical and Biochemical Changes
675
IX Total Nitrogen and Amino Acids
676
X Color
683
XII Classification and Standard of Fish Sauce
688
XIII Iodine Supplementation
689
XIV Histamine Formation
690
XV Research and Development
692
XVI Future Trends
698
References
699
Production of Thai Fermented Fish Plara Plasom Somfak
707
II Plasom and Somfak
711
Plara Plasom and Somfak
715
Plara Plasom and Somfak
716
Plara Plasom and Somfak
718
Industrialization of Thai Nham Fermented Pork or Beef
721
II Description
722
III Production
723
IV Production Process Flow
733
V How To Consume
734
References
735
Industrialization of Myanmar Fish Paste and Sauce Fermentation
737
II Production and Consumption
738
III History
739
IV Outline of Essential Steps in Ngapi Fermentation
740
V Indigenous Processes
742
VI Commercial Processing Methods
744
VIII Microbiology and Biochemistry of Fermentation
749
IX Harmful and Spoilage Microorganisms
754
X Essential Microorganisms for Fermentation
755
XI Standards of Ngapi
756
Standards for Ngapi and Nganpyaye
757
References
759
Industrialization of Indigenous Fermented Food Processes Biotechnological Aspects
763
II Fermentation Kinetics
765
III Bioreactor Design
766
IV Process Control
770
V Scaleup
771
VI Prospects for Process Improvement
772
VII Conclusion
778
Index
783
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