The Bard of the Dales, Or, Poems and Miscellaneous Pieces: Partly in the Yorkshire Dialect (Google eBook)

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John Hughes, 1850 - 184 pages
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Page 184 - the path he must tread : The hope of his happiness rises from fear, And his life he receives from the dead. His fairest pretensions must wholly be waved, And his best resolutions be cross'd ; Nor can he expect to be perfectly sav'd, Till he finds himself utterly lost. When all this is done, and his heart is
Page 42 - inspir'd, this holy strain :— "Let all thy converse be sincere, Thy conscience as the noon-day clear, For God's
Page 44 - far aboot a dreeam ; When thus a man, as he drew neear, Did say, 'Good friend, what seek you here, Where I have seen you soon and late ?' His dreeam tiv him he did relate. 'Dreams,' sez the man, 'are empty things, Mere thoughts that flit on silver'd wings, Unheeded we should let them pass
Page 184 - Till he finds himself utterly lost. When all this is done, and his heart is assured Of the total remission of sins ; When his
Page 45 - dark and deep, Where slimy creatures nightly creep, And human footsteps never tread, There is a store of treasure hid. If it be so, I have no doubt, Some lucky wight will find it out ; Yet so or not, is nought to me, For I shall ne'er go there to see !' The man did slyly twice or thrice, The Cockney thenk for his advice, Then
Page 44 - wings, Unheeded we should let them pass :— I've had a dream, and thus it was, That somewhere round this peopled ball, There's such a place as Lealholm Hall; Yet whether such a place there be, Or not, is all unknown to me.
Page 88 - Little spinner, blithe and gay, Dancing thus thy life away ! A King his palace might resign, For a couch as soft as thine ! Thou canst choose, as suits thee best, When to toil, and when to rest: Free from earthly care and strife, Merrily doth pass thy life. Ere the day begins to
Page 10 - past: Awd men like yoo hez seeaf beeath heeard An' seen a vast." "A vast Ah hev beeath heeard an' seen, An' felt misfotten's arrows keen, As yoo remark, whahl Ah hev
Page 170 - a Card party were enjoying themselves in an adjoining room. While sad I sit, oft musing over, Happy days for ever fled ; A lonely lodger in a corner, Like some hermit in his shed. All around seems blithe and merry; My light's dim and
Page 44 - Dreams,' sez the man, 'are empty things, Mere thoughts that flit on silver'd wings, Unheeded we should let them pass :— I've had a dream, and thus it was, That somewhere round this peopled ball, There's such a place as Lealholm

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