James VI and I

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Longman, 1998 - History - 234 pages
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In 1567 James Stuart, the infant son of Mary Queen of Scots, became king of Scotland (as James VI) on his mother's forced abdication; almost thirty-six years later, on 24th March 1603, he also inherited the English throne (this time as James I) on the death of Elizabeth. His subsequent joint reign united the two crowns, and established the Stuart - dynasty in England - and with it, according to many, much of the disastrous agenda that would lead to the deposition of his ill-starred son, Charles I. Roger Lockyer's new study (based throughout on primary as well as secondary sources) is the first major reappraisal of James in recent years to take new historiography fully into account. It throws fresh light on the major themes of early seventeenth-century British history, including religion, royal relations with political institutions, and the divine right of kings. Above all, while fully acknowledging James's limitations, it rescues the king from undeserved contempt.

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Contents

King of Scotland
1
Philosopher King and Lawgiver
34
The Union
51
Copyright

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