The history of the principal transactions of the Irish Parliament, from ... 1634 to 1666: containing proceedings of the Lords and Commons during the administration of the Earl of Strafford, and of the first Duke of Ormond, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Printed for T. Cadell, 1792 - Political Science
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Page 239 - ... volunteered on this difficult service, " proposing to go over in disguise, and to know the utmost of what could be done, and that if things were ripe for action he might be at the head of it, and if they grew successful to such a degree as might invite the great men of the kingdom, such as the marquess of Hertford, the earl of Northumberland, or others to come in, who might scruple to be commanded by him, he would resign the command and serve under them...
Page 14 - ... fail, if wind and weather fo ferved. Dermon being weary of his exiled life and diftrefled eftate, and therefore the more defirous to draw homewards for the recovery of his own, and for which he had fo long travelled and fought abroad ; he firft went to the church of St. David's, to make his orifons and prayers, and then the weather being fair and wind good, he adventureth the feas about the middle of Auguft ; and having a good paflage, he fhortly landed in his country ; and, with a very impatient...
Page 147 - When any Bill is committed, the committees have not authority to conclude, but only to order, reform, examine, and amend the thing committed unto them ; and of their doings they must give report to the House again, by whom the Bill is to be considered.
Page 137 - Lords devise, make, or establish any law ; the reasons are these : when Parliaments were first begun and ordained, there were no Prelates or Barons of the Parliament, and the Temporal Lords were very few or none, and then the King and his Commons did make a full Parliament, which authority was never hitherto abridged.
Page 32 - Henry II., king of England, was of a very good colour, but somewhat red ; his head great and round, his eyes were fiery, red, and grim, and his face very...
Page 58 - Lords where they went through the same stages ; and then the Lord Lieutenant gave the royal assent in the same form which is observed in Great Britain. In all these stages in England and Ireland, it is to be remembered that any Bill was liable to be rejected, amended...
Page 138 - ... commons of their lawful proceedings in parliament. The lords and commons, in time paft, did fit all in one houfe ; but, for the avoiding of confufion, they be now divided into two feveral houfes ; and yet, neverthelefs, they are of like and equal authority, every perfon of either of the faid houfes being named and counted a peer of the realm, (for the time of the parliament,) that is to fay, equal ; for par is equal. And therefore the opinion, cenfure, and judgment of a mean burgefs, is of as...
Page 309 - ... body, which was now by long ficknefs utterly wafted and decayed, it was rolled in fearcloths, put into a thin coffin of lead, and the lead one alfo put into a thick coffin of wood, which was filled up with pitch, and thefe were wrapped up in velvet ; it was thus, on...
Page 60 - Of the rejection of bills, or not returning them from England, it is faid there are very few inftances of fuch a refufal by the crown fince one thoufand feven hundred and eighty-two; though, doubtlefs, the royal negative in both kingdoms, is as clear a privilege as any other prerogative.
Page 367 - Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this prefent Parliament affembled, and by the Authority of the fame, That...

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