1418-1529 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Sir Henry Ellis
Harding, Triphook, & Lepard, 1825 - Great Britain
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Page 179 - He was a scholar, and a ripe and good one: Exceeding wise, fair spoken, and persuading; Lofty and sour to them that loved him not; But to those men that sought him sweet as summer. And though he were unsatisfied in getting, Which was a sin, yet in bestowing, madam. He was most princely: ever witness for him Those twins of learning that he raised in you, Ipswich and Oxford!
Page 88 - My Lord Howard hath sent me a letter, open to your Grace, within one of mine, by the which ye shall see at length the great victory that our Lord hath sent your subjects in your absence...
Page 13 - I, after long sufferance and delays, not my will or intent to displease my sovereign lord, seeing that the said duke ever prevaileth and ruleth about the king's person, that by this means the land is likely to be destroyed, am fully concluded to proceed in all haste against him, with the help of my kinsmen and friends...
Page 39 - Treasurer's house" might see the Rebels, who came bare-headed with halters about their necks before him, and cried out for mercy and pardon. The King addressed them in a short speech, and granted them his clemency, upon which they made a great shout, hurled away their halters, and cried
Page 273 - First, in the feast of Christmas, there was in the king's house, wheresoever he was lodged, a lord of misrule, or master of merry disports, and the like had ye in the house of every nobleman of honour or good worship, were he spiritual or temporal.
Page 273 - These lords beginning their rule on Alhollon eve, continued the same till the morrow after the Feast of the Purification, commonly called Candlemas day. In all which space there were fine and subtle disguisings, masks, and mummeries, with playing at cards for counters, nails, and points, in every house, more for pastime than for gain.
Page 88 - Grace with long writing, but, to my thinking, this batell hath bee to your Grace and al your reame the grettest honor that coude bee, and more than...
Page 20 - Picardy, which at first into Ireland called himself the bastard son of King Richard ; after that the son of the said Duke of Clarence; and now the second son of our father, King Edward the...
Page 12 - Advertisements, how be it that it was thought that they were full necessary, were laid apart, and to be of none effect, through the envy, malice and untruth of the said Duke of Somerset ; which for my truth faith, and allegiance that I owe unto the King, and the good will and favour that I have to all the Realm...