Naming Canada: Stories about Canadian Place Names

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University of Toronto Press, 2001 - History - 360 pages
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This wonderful collection of 76 essays explores the fascinating origin and meaning of the names of some of the towns, villages, cities, islands, mountains, and rivers that make up one of the world's largest countries. This new edition includes fifteen more essays, and updates the previous essays to include changes, corrections and new names to the year 2000.

Discover how some of Canada's most unusual place names came to be; unearth the Aboriginal roots of names such as Miramichi, Klondike, Iqaluit, Toronto, and Ottawa; learn the origin of such playful and mellifluous names as Medicine Hat, Twillingate, Flin Flon, Cupids, or Saint-Louis-du-Ha! Ha! From Bonavista and Port au Choix in the east, to Malaspina Strait and Port Alberni in the west, this book also reveals the rich Portuguese, Spanish, and Basque contributions to Canada's toponymic heritage. Naming Canada tells us about place names that became undesirable and had to be changed for reasons of perceived political impropriety. The former Stalin Township, for example, was renamed after Rick Hansen, the renowned Man in Motion, who promoted research in spinal cord injuries. The book also discusses Canadian names that have been exported abroad, such as Quebec in England and Toronto in Australia. One new essay explores the nicknames used for Canadian places, and focuses on Hogtown as an alternative for Toronto.

This collection is the best single source, in an engaging essay format, on the origin and meaning of hundreds of Canadian place names. Alan Rayburn has had over 35 years' experience in researching Canada's toponymic roots and in writing about the authentic backgrounds behind thousands of names, from Toronto in the south to Tukyoyaktuk in the north, and from Labrador in the east to Juan de Fuca Strait in the west.

  

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This is a Very intresting story i really enjoyed it

Contents

Introduction
3
Looking at Canadas Places from the Atlantic
13
The North South East and West of It
21
How Our National Parks Got Their Names
28
Some Gratifying Some Grating
38
Hogtown and Other Monikers across Canada
44
Pronouncing Names as the Locals Do
53
Sorting Out the SoundAlikes and LookAlikes
56
Telenaming the Landscape
172
Adopting Names of Native Origin and Acknowledging
181
Jacques Cartier in the Land of
187
Mystery Romance and Hints of Magic
194
In Canso Survival Is a Tradition
202
We Have Honoured the Moose 662 Times
212
A Land without Boundaries
219
Meech Lake of Accord Fame and Other Lakes
225

Whos to Blame for Mistake Names?
63
Avoid the Apostrophe But Not Always
69
When Names Become Politically Incorrect
77
Castle Mountain and Its ThirtyFiveYear Eisenhower
86
Capitalizing on Foreign Capitals
95
A Touch of Portuguese on the East Coast
103
Spanish Names along Our West Coast
111
Crimean Victories Commemorated across Canada
118
Names from First World
128
Canadian Names around the World
135
Sorting Out Ontarios Municipal MakeUp
144
Of Tickles and Rips Barachois and Bogans
152
Shakespeare Remembered in Many Canadian
155
Of Valentines and Other Matters of the Heart
164
Toronto Has a Great Fish Tale to Tell
233
Lake Laberge Rhymes with Marge and Other Yukon
240
Mackenzie Expeditions Left a Trail of Names
247
Calgary Kananaskis and Mount
253
Relocating the Lost Villages
260
Commemorating Prominent Individuals
269
Inspiration for More than Twentyfive
280
Canadian Tributes for Four Queen Elizabeths
287
Places Honouring an Illustrious Statesman
295
A Mountain for Michener a Lake for Leger
305
Remembering John F Kennedy
312
Index
321
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

ALAN RAYBURN is the former executive secretary of the Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names. He has written some 150 books, papers and articles in the toponymic field.

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