Manufacturing Time: Global Competition in the Watch Industry, 1795-2000

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Guilford Press, 2000 - Business & Economics - 309 pages
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Since the large-scale manufacture of personal timepieces began, industry leadership has shifted among widely disparate locations, production systems, and cultures. This book recounts the story of the quest for supremacy in the manufacture of watches--from the cottage industries of Britain; to the preeminence of Switzerland and, later, the United States; to the high-tech plants of Japan and the sweatshops of Hong Kong. Glasmeier examines both the strategies adopted by specific firms and the interplay of such varying influences as technological change, cyclical economic downturns, war, and national trade policies. In so doing, she delineates a cohesive framework within which to address such broader questions as how sustained regional economic development takes place (or starts and then stops); how decisions made by corporations are structured by internal and external forces; and the ways industrial cultures with different strategic learning capabilities facilitate or thwart the pursuit of technological change.
  

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Contents

From Keeping Time to Keeping Pace
1
The Need for and Constraints on Change
15
The Organizational Development
40
The Foundations
64
The Burden of Being First
70
The Long Road Downhill
85
Switzerland and the United States
91
Mechanization and Toolmaking
98
Costs of Redirection
136
The U S Industry after the Turn of the Century
144
The Statut de 1Horlogerie and the Codification
150
The U S Watch Industry
178
Bulova from the 1950s to the 1980s
186
Summary
201
Can One Man Save an Industry?
242
Notes
275

Summary
105
The Waltham Watch Company
112
Sowing the Seeds of Their Own Demise
119
The Hamilton Watch Company of Lancaster Pennsylvania
127
References
281
Index
297
About the Author
311
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Amy K. Glasmeier, PhD, is the director of the Center for Regional Research and Industrial Studies at the Institute for Policy Research and Evaluation, The Pennsylvania State University. She has published three books on international industrial and economic development and more than 50 scholarly articles. Her current research focuses on community impacts of globalization, regional development, poverty alleviation, and industrial change.

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