Imperial Identities: Stereotyping, Prejudice and Race in Colonial Algeria

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I.B.Tauris, May 15, 1995 - History - 323 pages
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Using colonial Algeria as the starting point of her analysis, Patricia Lorcin explores the manner in which ethnic categories and cultural distinctions are developed and used in society. She focuses on the colonial images of "good" Kabyle and "bad" Arab (usually referred to as the Kabyle Myth) and examines the circumstances out of which they arose, as well as the intellectual and ideological influences which shaped them. Her study demonstrates how these images were used to negate the underlying beliefs and values of the dominated society and to impose French cultural, social and political values. By tracing the evolution of ethnic categories over time, Lorcin reveals their inherently unstable nature and the continual process of redefinition in accordance with circumstance and political or social expediency.
  

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Contents

Kabyles and Arabs in warfare
17
the elaboration
35
Islam and society
53
The Royaume Arabe 18601870
76
Social sciences and military men
97
the impact
118
the Kabyle Myth
146
The eclipse of
167
Persistent stereotypes and resultant policies
217
Conclusion
241
Biographical sketches
296
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About the author (1995)

Patricia Lorcin has a doctorate from Columbia University and presently lives in Abidjan.

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