The equatorie of the planetis

Front Cover
At the University Press, 1955 - Science - 214 pages
0 Reviews

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

INTRODUCTION
3
H PROVENANCE AND PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION OF THE MANUSCRIPT
6
TRANSCRIPT AND FACSIMILES
17
TRANSLATION
47
NOTES ON THE TEXT
62
THE ASTRONOMICAL TABLES
75
Analysis of tables numerical values etc
79
Notes and other material inserted in the Tables
84
The Equatorie of the Planetis
130
alKashi
131
Later developments
132
PALAEOGRAPHY
134
Punctuation
135
LINGUISTIC ANALYSIS
137
Phonology
138
Accidence
141

HISTORY OF THE PLANETARY EQUATORIUM page
viii
THE PTOLEMAIC PLANETARY SYSTEM
93
General foundations of the theory
95
The Sun
97
Venus Mars Jupiter and Saturn
99
Mercury
101
The Moon
103
The Alfonsine precession
104
The technical terms of Ptolemaic astronomy as found in the text
107
Accuracy of the theory and the Equatorie
110
The calculation of planetary positions
116
Early history
119
Eleventh century
120
Twelfth and thirteenth centuries
123
John of Linieres
125
Richard of Wallingford
127
Summary
143
ASCRIPTION TO CHAUCER
149
The work was composed c 1392
151
Simon Bredon did not write this text
153
Connection with Chaucers Treatise on the Astrolabe
156
The Radix chaucer note
159
Comparison of handwriting
162
Ascription of the parenttext
164
GLOSSARY
167
Cipher passages in the Manuscript
182
n Compositio equatorii secundum Johannem de Lineriis
189
in Specimens of Middle English Scientific Texts
197
GENERAL INDEX
207
INDEX OF MANUSCRIPTS CITED
214
Copyright

About the author (1955)

Geoffrey Chaucer, one of England's greatest poets, was born in London about 1340, the son of a wine merchant and deputy to the king's butler and his wife Agnes. Not much is known of Chaucer's early life and education, other than he learned to read French, Latin, and Italian. His experiences as a civil servant and diplomat are said to have developed his fascination with people and his knowledge of English life. In 1359-1360 Chaucer traveled with King Edward III's army to France during the Hundred Years' War and was captured in Ardennes. He returned to England after the Treaty of Bretigny when the King paid his ransom. In 1366 he married Philippa Roet, one of Queen Philippa's ladies, who gave him two sons and two daughters. Chaucer remained in royal service traveling to Flanders, Italy, and Spain. These travels would all have a great influence on his work. His early writing was influenced by the French tradition of courtly love poetry, and his later work by the Italians, especially Dante, Boccaccio, and Petrarch. Chaucer wrote in Middle English, the form of English used from 1100 to about 1485. He is given the designation of the first English poet to use rhymed couplets in iambic pentameter and to compose successfully in the vernacular. Chaucer's Canterbury Tales is a collection of humorous, bawdy, and poignant stories told by a group of fictional pilgrims traveling to the shrine of St. Thomas a Becket. It is considered to be among the masterpieces of literature. His works also include The Book of the Duchess, inspired by the death of John Gaunt's first wife; House of Fame, The Parliament of Fowls, and The Legend of Good Women. Troilus and Criseyde, adapted from a love story by Boccaccio, is one of his greatest poems apart from The Canterbury Tales. Chaucer died in London on October 25, 1400. He was buried in Westminster Abbey, in what is now called Poet's Corner.

Bibliographic information