The history and traditions of the land of the Lindsays in Angus and Mearns, with notices of Alyth and Meigle. To which is added an appendix containing documents (Google eBook)

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Sutherland & Knox, 1853 - Angus (Scotland) - 359 pages
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Page 58 - And ancient towers crown his brow, That cast an awful look below ; Whose ragged walls the ivy creeps, And with her arms from falling keeps : So both a safety from the wind On mutual dependence find.
Page 75 - Unskilful he to fawn, or seek for power, By doctrines fashion'd to the varying hour; Far other aims his heart had learn'd to prize, More bent to raise the wretched than to rise.
Page 102 - It thundering shoots, and shakes the country round. At first, an azure sheet, it rushes broad ; Then whitening by degrees, as prone it falls, And from the...
Page 204 - Twas thus in Caledonia's domes, 'tis said, Thou ply'dst the kindly task in years of yore : At last, in luckless hour, some erring maid Spread in thy nightly cell of viands store : Ne'er was thy form beheld among their mountains more...
Page 204 - Hail, from thy wanderings long, my much lov'd sprite, Thou friend, thou lover of the lowly, hail! Tell, in what realms thou sport'st thy merry night, Trail'st the long mop, or whirl'st the mimic flail. Where dost thou deck the much-disorder'd hall, While the tir'd damsel in Elysium sleeps...
Page 12 - midst the wreck of things which were; There lie interr'd the more illustrious dead. The wind is up: hark! how it howls! Methinks Till now, I never heard a sound so dreary: Doors creak, and windows clap, and night's foul bird, Rook'd...
Page 12 - Strange things, the neighbours say, have happen'd here: Wild shrieks have issued from the hollow tombs : Dead men have come again, and walk'd about ; And the great bell has toll'd, unrung, untouch'd. (Such tales their cheer at wake or gossiping, When it draws near to witching time of night...
Page 64 - ... during the latter part of the last century and the beginning of the present.
Page 104 - Molest her ancient solitary reign. Beneath those rugged elms, that yew-tree's shade, Where heaves the turf in many a mould'ring heap, Each in his narrow cell forever laid, The rude forefathers of the hamlet sleep.
Page 143 - Ogilvies, by a rude but ancient custom, which bound the guest to take common part with his host in all dangers which might occur so long as the food eaten under his roof remained in his stomach.

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