13 Things That Don't Make Sense: The Most Baffling Scientific Mysteries of Our Time

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Random House LLC, 2009 - Science - 240 pages
34 Reviews
Spanning disciplines from biology to cosmology, chemistry to psychology to physics, Michael Brooks thrillingly captures the excitement of scientific discovery.Science’s best-kept secret is this: even today, thereare experimental results that the most brilliant scientists cannot explain. In the past, similar “anomalies” have revolutionized our world. If history is any precedent, we should look to today’s inexplicable results to forecast the future of science. Michael Brooks heads to the scientific frontier to confront thirteen modern-day anomalies and what they might reveal about tomorrow’s breakthroughs.
  

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Well written, thought provoking and educational. - LibraryThing
A good example is cold fusion. - LibraryThing
The book is well researched and paced. - LibraryThing
Yet, several experiments have confirmed their research. - LibraryThing

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User Review  - MarkBeronte - LibraryThing

Spanning disciplines from biology to cosmology, chemistry to psychology to physics, Michael Brooks thrillingly captures the excitement of scientific discovery.Science’s best-kept secret is this: even ... Read full review

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User Review  - passion4reading - LibraryThing

Michael Brooks introduces thirteen scientific mysteries that have the experts baffled: there's the missing universe, two errant spacecrafts, varying physics constants, cold fusion, life on Earth, a ... Read full review

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Contents

DEATH
122
SEH
136
FREEWILL
151
THE PLRCEBO EFFECT
164
HOMEOPOTHy
181
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
211
INDEX
225
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Michael Brooks, who holds a PhD in quantum physics, is an editor at New Scientist. His writing has appeared in the Guardian, Independent, Observer, Times Higher Educational Supplement, and even Playboy. He is a regular speaker and debate chair at the Science Festival in Brighton, UK.

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