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Books Books 1 - 10 of 29 on This rule, indeed, applies to the well quite as much as to the sick. I have never....  
" This rule, indeed, applies to the well quite as much as to the sick. I have never known persons who exposed themselves for years to constant interruption who did not muddle away their intellects by it at last. The process with them may be accomplished... "
Notes on Nursing: What it Is, and What it is Not - Page 50
by Florence Nightingale - 1860 - 140 pages
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Once a Week, Volume 2

Eneas Sweetland Dallas - 1860
...and, usually, the deficiency of sleep. Miss Nightingale says, in her " Notes on Nursing" (p. 29) : " I have never known persons who exposed themselves...did not muddle away their intellects by it at last." Nothing can be truer than this : and no persons are more hopeless, both as to intellect and nerve,...
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Homely hints from the fireside, by the author of 'Little things'.

Henrietta Wilson - 1860
...your time. Did you observe Miss Nightingale's remark in her admirable Notes on Nursing? She says,—"I have never known persons who exposed themselves for...did not muddle away their intellects by it at last." So be warned in time ! You will not misunderstand me so far as to think that I mean to advise you to...
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Notes on Nursing for the Labouring Classes

Florence Nightingale - Nursing - 1861 - 96 pages
...positive injury by interrupting, by "startling a fanciful" person, as it is called. Alas ! it is no fancy. This rule, indeed, applies to the well quite as much...pain. With the sick, pain gives warning of the injury. Do not meet or overtake a patient who is moving about in order to speak to him, or to give him any...
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The Christian Remembrancer, Volume 40

William Scott, Francis Garden, James Bowling Mozley - Christianity - 1860
...a fanciful" person, as it is called. Alas! it is no fancy.'—Ibid. p. 28. And further we find— ' This rule, indeed, applies to the well quite as much...without pain. With the sick, pain gives warning of the injury.'—Ibid. p. 29. It becomes important to know what it is that constitutes ' interruption' of...
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Health, husbandry, and handicraft

Harriet Martineau - Crafts & Hobbies - 1861 - 583 pages
...and, usually, the deficiency of sleep. Miss Nightingale says in her "Notes on Nursing" (p. 2'J) : " I have never known persons who exposed themselves...did not muddle away their intellects by it at last." Nothing can be truer than this : and no persona are more hopeless, both as to intellect and nerve,...
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Health, husbandry, and handicraft

Harriet Martineau - Crafts & Hobbies - 1861
...relief, and, usually, the deficiency of sleep. Miss Nightingale says hi her " Notes on Nursing" (p. " I have never known persons who exposed themselves...did not muddle away their intellects by it at last." Nothing can be truer than this : and no persons are more hopeless, both as to intellect and nerve,...
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Homely Hints for the Fireside

Conduct of life - 1862 - 145 pages
...your time. Did you observe Miss Nightingale's remark in her admirable Notes on Nursing? She says,—"I have never known persons who exposed themselves for...did not muddle away their intellects by it at last." So be warned in time ! You will not misunderstand me so far as to think that I mean to advise you to...
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The Intellectual Life

Philip Gilbert Hamerton - Conduct of life - 1873 - 455 pages
...Nightingale does not consider interruption baneful to sick persons only. " This rule indeed," she continues, "applies to the well quite as much as to the sick....With the sick, pain gives warning of the injury." Interruption is an evil to the reader which must be estimated very differently from ordinary business...
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The Intellectual Life

Philip Gilbert Hamerton - Culture - 1874 - 455 pages
...Nightingale does not consider interruption baneful to sick persons only. " This rule indeed," she continues, "applies to the well quite as much as to the sick....With the sick, pain gives warning of the injury." Interruption is an evil to the reader which must be estimated very differently from ordinary business...
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The Intellectual Life

Philip Gilbert Hamerton - Culture - 1875 - 455 pages
...does not consider interruption baneful to sick persons only. " This rule indeed," she continues, " applies to the well quite as much as to the sick....With the sick, pain gives warning of the injury." Interruption is an evil to the reader which must be estimated very differently from ordinary business...
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