Tudor Political Culture

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Dale Hoak
Cambridge University Press, Jun 20, 2002 - History - 326 pages
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This book of original scope and methodology consists of twelve interdisciplinary essays on the ideas, images and rituals of Tudor and early Stuart society. Through the exploitation of new manuscript material, or hitherto untapped artistic sources--the plates reproduce nearly sixty contemporary images--the authors open up new perspectives on the ideas, institutions and rituals of political society.Drawing on the evidence of art, literature, and using the latest techniques for the discovery of lost mentalities, key aspects of Tudor political culture are explored, including royal iconography, funereal symbolism, parliamentary elections, political vocabularies, kinship and family at court and in the country, and the architecture of urban authority. In his Introduction the editor uses the example of Henry VIII's historical break with Rome to suggest the seamless links between politics and political culture, how and why the revolution of the 1530s needs to be seen against the backdrop of early-Tudor memories of Henry V, the cult of chivalry and the invasion of France (1513), and the pre-Reformation imagery of 'imperial' kingship.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
On the road to 1534 the occupation of Tournai and Henry VIIIs theory of sovereignty
11
Family and kinship relations at the Henrician court the Boleyns and Howards
31
The iconography of the crown imperial
54
The royal image 15351603
104
Political culture and the built environment of the English country town c 15401620
133
Country into court court into country John Scudamore of Holme Lacy c 15421623 and his circles
157
Death be very proud Sidney subversion and Elizabethan heraldic funerals
179
O tis a gallant king Shakespeares Henry V and the crisis of the 1590s
204
Parliament and the political society of Elizabethan England
226
Image and ritual in the Tudor parliaments
243
The countervailing of benefits monopoly liberty and benevolence in Elizabethan England
272
The rhetoric of counsel in early modern England
292
Index
311
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