Cinema in a Democratic South Africa: The Race for Representation

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Indiana University Press, 2010 - History - 256 pages
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Lucia Saks uses South African cinema as a lens through which to view cultural changes resulting from the end of apartheid in 1994. She examines how media transformed the meaning of race and nation during this period and argues that, as apartheid was disbanded and new racial constructs allowed, South Africa quickly sought a new mode of representation as a way to distance itself from the violence and racism of the half-century prior, as well as to demonstrate stability amid social disruption. This rapid search for a new way to identify and portray itself is what Saks refers to as the race for representation. She contextualizes this race in terms of South African history, the media, apartheid, sexuality, the economy, community, early South African cinema, and finally speculates about the future of "counter-cinema" in present-day South Africa.

  

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 The Burdens of Representation
21
2 State and Market Enter the Race
49
Screening the Truthand Reconciliation Commission
83
Cinematic Interventions in STEPS for the Future
133
5 Quo Vadis? CounterCinema in South AfricaToday
153
6 The Dialectic of Reconciliation in DeVoortrekkers and Come See the Bioscope
179
Notes
211
Filmography
235
Index
239
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About the author (2010)

Lucia Saks is Assistant Professor in the Department of Screen Arts and Cultures, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

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