The Design of Things to Come: How Ordinary People Create Extraordinary Products

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Pearson Prentice Hall, Jun 28, 2011 - Business & Economics - 272 pages
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The iPod is a harbinger of a revolution in product design: innovation that targets customer emotion, self-image, and fantasy, not just product function. Read the hidden stories behind BodyMedia's SenseWear body monitor, Herman Miller's Mirra Chair, Swiffer's mops, OXO's potato peelers, Adidas' intelligent shoes, the new Ford F-150 pickup truck, and many other winning innovations. Meet the innovators, learning how they inspire and motivate their people, as they shepherd their visions through corporate bureaucracy to profitable reality.  The authors deconstruct the entire process of design innovation, showing how it really works, and how today's smartest companies are innovating more effectively than ever before.
  

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The design of things to come: how ordinary people create extraordinary products

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Vogel (director, Ctr. for Design Research and Innovation, Univ. of Cincinnatti) and Jonathan Cagan (mechanical engineering, Carnegie Mellon) previously coauthored Creating Breakthrough Products . Here ... Read full review

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Contents

The New Breed of Innovator
1
Pragmatic Business
2
Global Brand and Industrial Design
6
Engineering and Advanced Thinking
13
So Who Are the New Breed of Innovators?
17
Innovation Revealed
18
Pragmatic InnovationThe New Mandate
21
A Mandate for Change
22
BtoB InnovationThe New Frontier of Fantasy
125
The Industrial Frontier
128
Fantasy in Industrial Products
129
Going from Projects to Products
131
The Strategic Plan
134
Planning the Product
135
Planning the Corporate Approach to Product Development
137
Sewer Repair and Beyond
139

Pragmatic Innovation and How It Differs from Invention
23
The Redesign of the F150
29
Innovation in StartUps
32
Manufacturing QualityThe New Commodity
37
InnovationThe New Mandate
39
The Global Dimension of Innovation
42
Surfing the Waves of Innovation
45
The Art and Science of Business
47
Launching the Adidas 1
49
The Role of Marketing in the Early Stages of Product Development
52
The Ambiguity of Figuring Out Winning Products
54
A Sound Basis for Vision Yes You Can Go with Your Instinct
55
A Process for Pragmatic Innovation
57
Identify an Area of Strategic Importance
58
Research People
59
Define the Opportunity
60
Achieve the Criteria
61
Thinking Required
62
Innovation Yields Differentiation
64
Motivation Needed
65
Identifying Todays Trend for Tomorrows Innovations
67
Lead Users and New Technology
69
Trend Reader
70
So How Does One Read Trends?
72
Products Impacting Trends
74
In Reading Trends It Is All About People
78
Designing the Mirra Chair
82
Design for DesireThe New Product Prescription
87
The Harry Potter Phenomenon
88
Form and Function
90
The Fantasy Economy
92
Fantasy in Everyday Products
94
Form and Function Fulfilling Fantasy
97
The Harry Potter Fantasy
98
FantasyDriven Products in Everyday Experiences
101
The Powers of StakeholdersPeople Fueling Innovation
105
Lubrizolfrom Technology to Product
107
The Lens of Powers of 10
112
Powers of 10 in Action
114
Blending
116
System Operation
117
Community
119
Region
120
Continent
121
The World Above the Sewer
142
Making Decisions for ProfitSuccess Emerging from Chaos
145
Complexity in the DecisionMaking Process
147
Organizing the DecisionMaking Process
149
The Butterfly Effect
153
Chaos Within Structure
155
Interdisciplinary Decision Making
156
A Process for Product Innovation
163
New Balance
165
Innovation by Cooperation
166
Four Phases of New Product Development
168
Identifying Product Opportunities
169
Understanding the Product Opportunity
172
Conceptualizing the Product Opportunity
177
Realizing the Product Opportunity
179
Creating a Blanket of IP to Protect Your Brand from the Elements
183
A PG Innovation Success
185
Why Is Swiffer Out Front?
187
Utility Patents
188
Design Patents
189
Copyright and Trademark
191
Trade Dress
192
Trade Secret
193
Using IP for Brand and Product Life Cycle
194
Patenting a Product System
195
Patenting Product Manufacture and Delivery
197
IP in Summary
198
To Hire Consultants or Build InternallyThat Is the Question
199
The Power of Design
201
Using Product Development Consultants
202
The Starbucks of Product Design
205
The Consultant Menu
209
Customer Research and Design
211
Hiring to Balance Soft and Hard Quality
214
Managing Design
216
The Powers of InnovationThe New Economy of Opportunity
221
The Power of the Individual
222
The Power to Redirect the Company
224
The Power to Expand the Market
225
The Power to Redefine Our Local Environment
226
The Power of Shifts in the Global Economy
228
The Power of the New Renaissance
230
Index
233
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Craig M. Vogel is a professor in the School of Design and director of the Center for Design Research and Innovation in the college of Design Architecture, Art and Planning at the University of Cincinnati. He has developed an approach to design that integrates teaching and research. He has worked with a variety of companies as a consultant for new product development and strategic planning.

Jonathan Cagan, Ph.D., P.E., is a professor of mechanical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. His research, teaching, and extensive consulting focus on product development, strategic planning, and design. He has developed team-based tools and computer-based technologies to improve the process of design conceptualization.

Peter Boatwright, Ph.D., is associate professor of marketing in the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University. His expertise and teaching focus on new product marketing, consumer marketing, and marketing research methods. In his research, Professor Boatwright has developed new statistical methods, as well as additional theories of consumer behavior.

The authors have worked with a variety of companies, including, Procter & Gamble, International Truck and Engine, Respironics, Alcoa, Kennametal, New Balance, Kraft Foods, Motorola, Lubrizol, Ford, General Motors, Whirlpool, RedZone Robotics, DesignAdvance Systems, and Exxon Chemical.

Professors Cagan and Vogel are coauthors of the book Creating Breakthrough Products, which is a detailed approach to navigating the fuzzy front end of product development.


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