Speech and Language Processing: An Introduction to Natural Language Processing, Computational Linguistics, and Speech Recognition

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Prentice Hall, 2009 - Computers - 988 pages
12 Reviews

An explosion of Web-based language techniques, merging of distinct fields, availability of phone-based dialogue systems, and much more make this an exciting time in speech and language processing. The first of its kind to thoroughly cover language technology at all levels and with all modern technologies this book takes an empirical approach to the subject, based on applying statistical and other machine-learning algorithms to large corporations. Builds each chapter around one or more worked examples demonstrating the main idea of the chapter, usingthe examples to illustrate the relative strengths and weaknesses of various approaches. Adds coverage of statistical sequence labeling, information extraction, question answering and summarization, advanced topics in speech recognition, speech synthesis. Revises coverage of language modeling, formal grammars, statistical parsing, machine translation, and dialog processing. A useful reference for professionals in any of the areas of speech and language processing.

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Review: Speech and Language Processing: An Introduction to Natural Language Processing, Computational Linguistics and Speech Recognition

User Review  - Carl-Erik Kopseng - Goodreads

One of the better computer science titles I have read. Comprehensive and contains enough info on everything to give you a good basic understanding. As little bit of math is required for understanding, but it is a science book after all :-) Read full review

Review: Speech and Language Processing: An Introduction to Natural Language Processing, Computational Linguistics and Speech Recognition

User Review  - Mayuri - Goodreads

nice book Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
RegularExpressionsandAutomata
17
Words and Transducers
45
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Dan Jurafsky is an associate professor in the Department of Linguistics, and by courtesy in Department of Computer Science, at Stanford University. Previously, he was on the faculty of the University of Colorado, Boulder, in the Linguistics and Computer Science departments and the Institute of Cognitive Science. He was born in Yonkers, New York, and received a B.A. in Linguistics in 1983 and a Ph.D. in Computer Science in 1992, both from the University of California at Berkeley. He received the National Science Foundation CAREER award in 1998 and the MacArthur Fellowship in 2002. He has published over 90 papers on a wide range of topics in speech and language processing.

James H. Martin is a professor in the Department of Computer Science and in the Department of Linguistics, and a fellow in the Institute of Cognitive Science at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He was born in New York City, received a B.S. in Comoputer Science from Columbia University in 1981 and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California at Berkeley in 1988. He has authored over 70 publications in computer science including the book A Computational Model of Metaphor Interpretation.

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