Networks of Power: Electrification in Western Society, 1880-1930

Front Cover
JHU Press, Mar 1, 1993 - Science - 474 pages
2 Reviews
Awarded the Dexter Prize by the Society for the History of Technology, this book offers a comparative history of the evolution of modern electric power systems. It described large-scale technological change and demonstrates that technology cannot be understood unless placed in a cultural context.
  

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Review: Networks of Power: Electrification in Western Society, 1880-1930

User Review  - Sara M. Watson - Goodreads

Hughes looks at the production of electricity to understand the social institutions and structures that made the complex system possible. Hughes three phases of adoption are helpful for thinking about ... Read full review

Review: Networks of Power: Electrification in Western Society, 1880-1930

User Review  - Tom King - Goodreads

Long, dry, and completely fascinating. The focus on industrial logic and tangible consumer benefits in business plans seems anachronistic compared with businesses today where shareholder profits are mentioned first, last, and only. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Invention and Development
18
Technology Transfer
47
Reverse Salients and Critical Problems
79
Conflict and Resolution 706
106
Technological Momentum
140
The Coordination of Technology and Politics
175
The Dominance of Technology
201
California White Coal
262
War and Acquired Characteristics
285
Planned Systems
324
The Culture of Regional Systems
363
The Style of Evolving Systems
404
Epilogue
461
Index I
467
Copyright

The Primacy of Politics
227

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References to this book

Spatial Formations
Nigel Thrift
No preview available - 1996
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About the author (1993)

Thomas P. Hughes is the Mellon Professor Emeritus in the Department of the History and Sociology of Science at the University of Pennsylvania and Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship and a member of the American Philosophical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Hughes has honorary doctorates from Northwestern University and the Swedish Royal Institute of Technology. A member of the Swedish Royal Academy of Engineering Sciences and the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, he is the editor of seven books and author of four, including "American Genesis: A Century of Invention and Technological Enthusiasm, 1870-1970," a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

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