The Scottish Tourist, and Itinerary; Or, A Guide to the Scenery and Antiquities of Scotland and the Western Islands: With a Description of the Principal Steam-boat Tours (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Stirling and Kenney, 1838 - Scotland - 455 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Related books

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 73 - Have, then, thy wish!" he whistled shrill, And he was answered from the hill ; Wild as the scream of the curlew From crag to crag the signal flew. Instant, through copse and heath, arose Bonnets and spears and bended bows ; On right, on left, above, below, Sprung up at once the lurking foe...
Page 97 - Let fortune's gifts at random flee, They ne'er shall draw a wish frae me, Supremely blest wi' love and thee, In the Birks of Aberfeldy.
Page 149 - Arcadian plain. Pure stream ! in whose transparent wave My youthful limbs I wont to lave ; No torrents stain thy limpid source ; No rocks impede thy dimpling course, That sweetly warbles o'er its bed, With white round...
Page 437 - THE BORROWER WILL BE CHARGED AN OVERDUE FEE IF THIS BOOK 18 NOT RETURNED TO THE LIBRARY ON OR BEFORE THE LAST DATE STAMPED BELOW. NON-RECEIPT OF OVERDUE NOTICES DOES NOT EXEMPT THE BORROWER FROM OVERDUE FEES.
Page 78 - gan peep A narrow inlet, still and deep, Affording scarce such breadth of brim As served the wild duck's brood to swim.
Page 142 - KIND friends, neighbors hospitable, cordial, even respectful, an ancient name, a large estate, and a sufficient fortune, a comfortable home, supplied with all the necessaries and many of the luxuries of life, and a troop of servants, black and white, eager to do your bidding ; good health, affectionate children, and, let us humbly add, a good cook, cellar, and library ought not a person...
Page 149 - The springing trout in speckled pride, The salmon, monarch of the tide; The ruthless pike, intent on war, The silver eel, and mottled par. Devolving from thy parent lake, A charming maze thy waters make, By bowers of birch and groves of pine, And hedges flower'd with eglantine.
Page 122 - Turn your astonish'd eyes ; behold yon huge And unhewn sphere of living adamant, Which, poised by magic, rests its central weight On yonder pointed rock ; firm as it seems, Such is its strange and virtuous property, It moves obsequious to the gentlest touch Of him whose breast is pure ; but to a traitor, Tho' even a giant's prowess nerv'd his arm, It stands as fixed as Snowdon.
Page 126 - No more its arches echo to the noise Of joy and festive mirth. No more the glance Of blazing taper through its windows beams, And quivers on the undulating wave : But naked stand the melancholy walls, Lash'd by the wintry tempests, cold and bleak, That whistle mournful thro' the empty halls, And piece-meal crumble down the tow'rs to dust.
Page 156 - Of household smoke, your eye excursive roams: Wide-stretching from the Hall, in whose kind haunt The hospitable Genius lingers still, To where the broken landscape, by degrees, Ascending, roughens into rigid hills; O'er which the Cambrian mountains, like far clouds That skirt the blue horizon, dusky rise.

Bibliographic information