A History of the Gunpowder Plot, the Conspiracy and Its Agents

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BiblioBazaar, 2008 - History - 348 pages
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This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

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About the author (2008)

Sidney is perhaps the supreme example of the ideal Elizabethan gentleman, embodying those traits as soldier, scholar, and courtier that Elizabethans most admired. As the nephew of Robert Dudley, earl of Leicester (the favorite of Queen Elizabeth), and the son of a lord deputy of Ireland, his social and court connections were impeccable. He traveled widely in France, Germany, and Italy, and served the queen as courtier and ambassador before his death in battle in the Low Countries, a death that only added to his glamour. His writings in prose and poetry were not intended for publication but for private circulation among aristocratic friends. His pastoral prose romance Arcadia (1590) is sprinkled with poetry and was much admired in his day, as it is in ours. His A Defence of Poesie (1595) is one of the great critical treatises in English and brilliantly summarizes the Renaissance ideal in literature: to instruct as well as to delight. His sonnet sequence Astrophil and Stella (1591) is one of the first and perhaps the finest of the great Elizabethan sonnet cycles. Its influence on subsequent love poetry has been enormous. What gives the sequence its special appeal is Sidney's ability to bring fresh vigor to poetical conventions and to dramatize the entire sequence of 108 sonnets.

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