The ports, harbours, watering-places, and coast scenery of Great Britain (Google eBook)

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G. Virtue, 1842 - Travel
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Page 157 - Come on, sir; here's the place: stand still. How fearful And dizzy 'tis, to cast one's eyes so low! The crows, and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles : Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire; dreadful trade! Methinks, he seems no bigger than his head: The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice; and yon' tall anchoring bark, Diminish'd to her cock; her cock, a buoy Almost too small for sight: The murmuring surge.
Page 153 - Her home is on the deep. With thunders from her native oak She quells the floods below As they roar on the shore, When the stormy tempests blow ; When the battle rages loud and long, And the stormy tempests blow.
Page 181 - O could I flow like thee, and make thy stream My great example, as it is my theme! Though deep, yet clear, though gentle, yet not dull, Strong without rage, without o'er-flowing full.
Page 153 - Britannia needs no bulwarks, No towers along the steep ; Her march is o'er the mountain- waves, Her home is on the deep.
Page 42 - Abram's happiness : What more may heaven do for earthly man Than thus to pour out plenty in their laps, Ripping the bowels of the earth for them, Making the seas their servants, and the winds To drive their substance with successful blasts?
Page 102 - He is unworthy of the name of a gentleman, or soldier, in my opinion, that is afraid to sacrifice his life for the honour of God, his King, and Country. JOHN FELTON...
Page 32 - Marley, to the Scottish army, under the Earl of Leven ; and in 1782, it was advertised to be let, by the lessee under the crown, John Crichloe Turner, Esq., as a place most suitable for a wind-mill. As it contained a good spring of water, the hydraulic capabilities of the property were not overlooked by the advertiser. " There is a good spring of water within the castle," saith he, " which renders it a very eligible situation for a brewery, or any manufactory that requires a constant supply of water.
Page 157 - tis to cast one's eyes so low ! The crows, and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles. Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire ; dreadful trade ! Methinks he seems no bigger than his head. The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice ; and yon' tall, anchoring bark, Diminished to her cock ; her cock, a buoy Almost too small for sight.
Page 161 - O England ! dearer far than life is dear, If I forget thy prowess, never more Be thy ungrateful son allowed to hear Thy green leaves rustle, or thy torrents roar.
Page 28 - In the mouth of the fresh-water stream it is from four to three fathom, but there are large flats and sand-banks lying before it. A ship of moderate draught may, notwithstanding, go a long way up this river with a flowing tide, for it rises perpendicularly near ten feet, and at the full and change of the moon, it is high water about nine o'clock. Six leagues within Cape Colville...

References from web pages

Antique Maps & Engravings of Cheshire
Finden The Ports, Harbours, Watering Places and Coast Scenery of Great Britain. London: G. Virtue, 1841-2. Drawn by JD Harding from a sketch by Jendle ...
www.heatons-of-tisbury.co.uk/ cheshire.htm