An introduction to the study of Milton (Google eBook)

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Rodgers, 1867 - 106 pages
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Page 20 - What matter where, if I be still the same, And what I should be, all but less than he Whom thunder hath made greater? Here at least We shall be free...
Page 6 - Heaven, with all his host Of rebel angels, by whose aid, aspiring To set himself in glory...
Page 56 - Neither do I think it shame to covenant with any knowing reader that for some few years yet I may go on trust with him toward the payment of what I am now indebted...
Page 19 - Infernal World! and thou, profoundest Hell, Receive thy new possessor one who brings A mind not to be changed by place or time. The mind is its own place, and in itself Can make a Heaven of Hell, a Hell of Heaven.
Page 8 - A dungeon horrible, on all sides round As one great furnace flamed, yet from those flames No light, but rather darkness visible Served only to discover sights of woe, Regions of sorrow, doleful shades, where peace And rest can never dwell, hope never comes That comes to all...
Page 39 - Awaiting what command their mighty Chief Had to impose. He through the armed files Darts his experienced eye, and soon traverse The whole battalion views their order due, Their visages and stature as of Gods; 570 Their number last he sums. And now his heart Distends with pride, and, hardening in his strength, Glories...
Page 4 - Muse, that on the secret top Of Oreb, or of Sinai, didst inspire That shepherd, who first taught the chosen seed, In the beginning how the Heavens and Earth Rose out of Chaos...
Page 5 - Before all temples the upright heart and pure, Instruct me, for thou know'st ; thou from the first Wast present, and, with mighty wings outspread, Dove-like sat'st brooding on the vast abyss, And mad'st it pregnant : what in me is dark, Illumine ; what is low, raise and support ; That to the height of this great argument I may assert eternal Providence, And justify the ways of God to men.
Page 50 - Indian mount; or faery elves, Whose midnight revels, by a forest side Or fountain, some belated peasant sees, Or dreams he sees, while overhead the moon Sits arbitress, and nearer to the Earth Wheels her pale course; they, on their mirth and dance Intent, with jocund music charm his ear; At once with joy and fear his heart rebounds.
Page 23 - Busiris and his Memphian chivalry, While with perfidious hatred they pursued The sojourners of Goshen, who beheld From the safe shore their floating carcasses And broken chariot wheels : so thick bestrewn, Abject and lost lay these, covering the flood, Under amazement of their hideous change. He called so loud, that all the hollow deep Of Hell resounded.

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