The Correspondence of Robert Bowes, of Aske, Esquire, the Ambassador of Queen Elizabeth in the Court of Scotland, Volume 14 (Google eBook)

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J. B. Nichols and son, 1842 - England - 588 pages
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Contents

From the same to Lord Burghley and Sir Francis Wal
45
From Robert Bowes to Lord Burghley and
50
Act of Council at Richmond for directing Robert Bowes
61
Queen Elizabeths cause the Kings motions An extract
63
From the same to the same acquaints them of some intended
67
Letter from ROBERT BOWES to LORD BURGHLEY and
71
From the same to Lord Burghley and Sir Francis Wal
76
From the same to the Earl of Leicester reports that
81
From the same to Lord Burghley and Secretary Wal
82
Letter from the same to SIR FRANCIS WALSINGHAM unsettled state of the government in Scotland promising further
91
From Queen Elizabeth to Robert Bowes under the hand of Secretary Walsingham ordering him to repair
135
Letter from ROBERT BOWES to SIR FRANCIS WALSING
156
From ROBERT BOWES to SECRETARY WALSINGHAM notice
157
To ROBERT BOWES intelligence of troops being levied
165
From the same to SIR FRANCIS WALSINGHAM praying
168
From the same to the same Lennoxs practices discovered by the confession of the Laird of Whittyngham who implicates
174
Letter from the same to the same concerning the money
196
From the same to the same private his conference with
202
From Lord Burghley and Secretary Walsingham to Robert Bowes instructions for him to make some strong
209
Letter from the same to the same communicates a report
210
From the same to the same proceedings of the nobility
215
From the same to the same the Dukes movements the King
221
Letter from the same to the same the party who have pos
222
From the same to the same two ambassadors to be sent to the English court the King displeased with the supineness
238
Private From the LetterBook p 56 245 125 Letter from the same to the same affairs in a precarious state
247
From the same to the same Gowry still hesitates to
253
From the same to the same praying to be revoked unless
260
From the same to the same the Duke still delays his
267
From the same to the same with hia own hand informa
346
From Robert Bowes to the same private the French
355
From Robert Bowes to the same the knavery of
363
From Robert Bowes to the same the attempt to
369
From Robert Bowes to the same private the
376
Letter from the same to the same Davisons interview with
382
From Robert Bowes to the same in favour of Roger
389
From the same to the same incloses a letter received from
397
From the LetterBook p 172
404
From the same to the same in commendation of Robert Cun
414
From the same to the same private Bowes employs
421
Book p 189
425
From the same to the same corrects an error respecting
432
From the same to the same in favour of Capt William
439
From the same to the same account of a conference with the King information concerning the state of parties about
445
From the same to the same return of Stewart and Colville
457
From the same to the same private respecting a
463
From the same to the same account of a discussion with
469
From the same to the same the King and council consult
483
From the same to the same private concerning the asso
491
From the same to the same the English party still generally
501
From the same to the same account of a conference with
510
From the same to the same account of an interview with
519
From the same to the same account of a conference with
525
From the same to Sir Francis Walsingham proceed
552
court the division of the abbey lands among the nobles
559
From the same to the same Dunfermling apprehended
565
From the same to the same details respecting the movements
576

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Page 352 - ... of the continuance of her good will, favor, and assistance, he took it in very grateful part ; acknowledging her manifold deservings at his hands to be worthy of an extraordinary love and thankfulness towards her, above all the princes of the earth ; who, he protested, had won such especial interest in him as she might no less account and dispose of him than of herself, as his actions and deeds should give good testimony.
Page 111 - ... as is conteyned in your last letters. And so, &c. LVII.— "M. TO MR. BOWES; 1st September, 1580." From the Cottonian MS. Calig. C. vi. fol. 68, b. SIR, Her Majesty entred into consideracion of their last dispache, her pleasure is that you should be willed to folde the way of perswasion, and to forbeare to enter into conference with any of them of any force to be used, or promise of assistance from her Majestye, untill such tyme as she shalbe advertised by you from thence of the necessitye thereof,...
Page 3 - Quene do say that oportunitye well serveth in these dayes to worke her good. But they grone to fynd that procede and prosper no better. The Carres have bene at Edinburghe, at a lawe day, to persue the slaughter of a Carre slayne by the Rotherforthes and the Turnbulles, whome the Lord Angus semeth to favour ; but the matter is adjourned to a newe day. The Lord Maxwell contynueth in warde upon suspicion of intent to arise troobles on the Borders. Thus ceassing further to trooble yowe untill newe occasion,...
Page v - A MEETING of the COUNCIL of the SURTEES SOCIETY was held at Mr. Ward's Office on the 26th Dec. 1842, by adjournment. RESOLVED, That the publications of the SOCIETY for 1842 be the HUTTON PAPERS and the BOWES PAPERS, and that Mr. RAINE be requested to edit the former and Mr. STEVENSON the latter, with the usual remuneration ; the usual number of copies of each to be printed. J. WARD., Chairman.
Page 410 - France, and others. They all agree and certify that 870 shall return this summer into 70; and some of them write that it shall be sooner than some of his enemies look for. It appeareth that he is persuaded and purposed to return, notwithstanding that 91 shall not assent thereto. For he presumeth (that upon the former promise made by 91 before his departure from 70, assuring him that he should come again within the half year with his favour, and by the assistance of the lords), that he shall easily...
Page 410 - Manningville has an especial commission to sound and feel the resolute minds of all such as 870 hath presented and named to be his friends in 70 ; and also to receive at their hands such assurances as may suffice 149 and 23 to send and return 870 with forces and money, and with all requisites for their aid, and for the advancement of the cause to be taken in hand. Hereupon Manningville sayeth that the reputation and welfare of 870 lyeth in his hands. He hath an evil opinion of 870, condemning his...
Page 111 - Majesties name, there shalbe no order taken for the stay of the delivery therof, then would her Majesty you conferre with the earle Moreton and other thenemies to the erle of Lennox how this matter may be helped eyther by layeing violent hands on the said earle and his principall associates, in case no other more temperate course may be found for the remedye thereof, or by some other way that by him shalbe thought mete, wherein her Majesty willeth you to assure them that they -shall not lack any...
Page 7 - Argile departed out of the castle, and he is nowe gone to levye his forces, minding to returne within two dayes at the farthest. In this uprore th'eldest sonne of the master was so crushed in the thronge, as he died the next daye. The master is fallen into vehement disease, with daunger of his life.
Page 209 - If the work be at this time stayed, or fall, the building, I think, will never after prosper ; for our credit broken so far shall be unable to repair the breach, and the loss of the good instrument to be now cast away by our default will not suddenly be recovered, nor be...
Page 285 - King hath showed such manifest signs, witnessing a great change and alteration in his conceit and favour towards the duke, as the lords are highly comforted therewith ; for with unaccustomed oath he hath protested to and assured the noblemen with his colour changed, his hands lifted up, that if the duke shall disobey this charge, then he shall never from henceforth have to do with the duke, nor show favour to him nor to any of his favorers, but to esteem him and them as his enemies; and that he shall...

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