Edinburgh

Front Cover
Pan Macmillan, Mar 21, 2011 - History - 456 pages
4 Reviews
The late poet laureate, Sir John Betjeman, said that Edinburgh was the most beautiful city in Europe. Like some other great cities it is set on seven hills. But only one of these, Rome, rivals Edinburgh in matching the beauty of its setting with the stateliness of its buildings. Edinbrugh, too, provides the backdrop to much of the dark drama of the Scottish past, from Mary Queen of Scots to Bonnie Prince Charlie and beyond. Michael Fry, who has lived and worked there for nearly forty years, provides a compellingly readable account of this great city, from the earliest times to the present, balancing Edinburgh's cultural, political and social history, and painting a vivid portrait of a city - that like Stevenson's Dr Jekyll - is both dark and light, both dark and light, both 'Auld Reekie' and 'Athens of the North'. ‘Impressive ... in the style of Peter Ackroyd’s history of London’ Magnus Linklator, Spectator 'No one interested in the history of Edinburgh, and indeed Scotland, should be without it’ Allan Massie, Scotsman

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Review: Edinburgh: A History Of The City

User Review  - Chaundra - Goodreads

Another book for which it would be useful to have half stars. It's not a bad book per se and there are a spots of really interesting factoids and bits of local colour included. Sadly, the total lack of organisation & focus make it difficult to read. I wouldn't recommend it. Read full review

Review: Edinburgh: A History Of The City

User Review  - Sally - Goodreads

This is a good history of Edinburgh as far as the facts go but it needed some livening up. It is at its best when the author uses a little humor. It is a good starting point to learn more about the city. Read full review

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About the author (2011)

Michael Fry is a historian and writer who lives and has worked in Edinburgh since 1970. Since 1988 he has published seven books of Scottish history, each of which has overthrown some cherished myth.

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