Tintin - Tintin Co

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Egmont Children's Books, 2007 - 128 pages
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"Tintin & Co." is the perfect book to celebrate Herge's centenary. Michael Farr has written numerous books on Tintin and Herge as well as translating several others into English. His writing style is engaging and easy to read, with several moments of shared humour as readers will recall their favourite moments from the stories. Illustrations, facts and Herge's early sketches provide a remarkable insight into the fictional world of Tintin and into the real world time in which Herge was writing. As well as covering the main characters - Tintin, Snowy, Captain Haddock, Professor Calculus, Thomson and Thompson and Bianca Castafiore - this book also includes chapters on the Arab princeling Abdullah, chess-loving General Alcazar, the villainous Doctor Mueller, Tintin's mortal enemy Rastapopoulous, the insurance salesman Joylon Wagg who is always turning up at unexpected moments and the orphan Tchang. This title is guaranteed to be a success with fans of the quiff-headed journalist - definitely something to read in front of a warm fire, in a big comfortable settee.

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About the author (2007)

Michael Farr is a leading British Tintinologist, and an expert on the comic series Tintin and its creator, Herg . He has written several books on the subject as well as translating translating several others into English. Farr was a reporter and foreign correspondent for Reuters and then the Daily Telegraph. He was soon sent to many of the destinations familiar to Tintin, including Africa, the former Soviet Union, and Central and eastern Europe. When based in Brussels, he became acquainted with the creator of Tintin, Herg, and was later to have access to his extensive archives.

'Hergé' was born Georges Remi on 22 May, 1907 in Etterbeek, a suburb of Brussels, in Belgium. After leaving school, he worked for the daily newspaper, Le XXe Siècle (The 20th Century). He was responsibe the for the section of the newspaper designed for children. Tintin, the main character in his works, was introduced on January 10, 1929 in a story entitled 'Tintin in the Land of the Soviets.' Each story ran as a comic strip in the newspaper and then was published as a book. Some of these books were adapted for the small screen including The Crab With The Golden Claws, Star of Mystery, Red Rakham's Treasure, Black Island, Objective Moon and The Calculus Affair. French TV produced longer versions of twenty of the books in 1992, which have been broadcast in over fifty countries. On 3 March, 1983, he died in Brussels. At the time of his death, he was working on Tintin and the Alpha-Art, which was published in an unfinished form.

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