The Fleet of the Future : Iron Or Wood?: Containing a Reply to Some Conclusions of General Sir Howard Douglas, Bart., G.C.B., F.R.S., &c., in Favour of Wooden Walls (Google eBook)

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Longman, Green, Longman, & Roberts, 1861 - Great Britain - 57 pages
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Page 14 - ... twenty-four hours and have her always ready for service; indeed, many steamers were obliged to leave the coast of China and go to Bombay for repairs. Repairs which would have taken in a wooden ship several days, would take in ours as many hours only.
Page 2 - Government, as to the use and efficiency of a certain half-dozen iron frigates, txvo of which were finished, and four constructing by contract: I stated in reply, that vessels wholly constructed of iron were utterly unfit for all the purposes of war, whether armed, or as transports for the conveyance of troops.
Page 6 - That iron steam-ships-of-war may be built as strong as wooden ships of greater weight, and stronger than wooden ships of equal weight. " 2. That iron ships of equal strength can go on less draught of water than wooden ships. " 3. That iron ships can carry much heavier weights than wooden ships. " 4. That they are more durable. " 5. That they are safer against the sea. "6. That they are safer against fire. '' 7. That they are much safer against explosive shells. " 8. That they are much safer against...
Page 14 - ... striking with reduced velocity, as when fired from a distance, would make large jagged holes which could not be plugged from the inside; that shot striking a rivet or rivets, as at the junction of four plates they might do, would make a large breach in the side of the ship; that the shot might break on impact, and its fragments, together with those of the plate*, would drive Into the ship a mass of splinters, consisting of pieces of shot, bolts, bolt-heads, nuts, and innumerable pieces of iron,...
Page 2 - In favor of the latter we have a conservative party represented by Sir HOWARD DOUGLAS, who is probably the ablest living advocate of " wooden walls." It is his opinion " that ships formed wholly, or nearly so, of iron, are utterly unfit for all the purposes and contingencies of war, whether as fighting ships or as transports for troops.
Page 17 - Eastern, his opponent first disproves his assertions and predictions regarding her, and then states the facts regarding iron war-ships which have been ascertained by actual experiment. Experience has proved, first, that " when the thickness of a vessel's side is not more than half an inch, shots fired obliquely have glanced off the iron vessel which would have penetrated a wooden ship ; second, that shots fired directly have passed through both sides of the ship, doing less damage to the ship directly...
Page 16 - ... that shot striking with reduced velocity, as when fired from a distance, would make large jagged holes which could not be plugged from the inside; that shot striking a rivet or rivets, as at the junction of four plates they might do, would make a large breach in the side of the ship; that the shot might break on impact, and its fragments, together with those of the plates, would drive into the ship a mass of splinters, consisting of pieces of...
Page 18 - ... plates of wrought-iron, even five-eighths of an inch, are proof against shells ; that iron plates four inches and a half thick are nearly impenetrable to shot fired from the heaviest nature of guns ; and, finally, that plates six inches thick are practically impenetrable.
Page 14 - Chinese war, she was in one action struck fourteen times by the shot of the enemy ; " one shot went in at one side and came out at the other, it went right through the vessel ;" there were " no splinters :" " it went through just as if you put your finger through a piece of paper.
Page 20 - Longmans & Co. in 1861, the author remarks (p. 20) : " A good many years ago, I happened to converse with the chief naval architect of one of our dockyards on the subject of building ships of iron. The answer was characteristic, and the feeling it expressed so strong and natural that I have never forgotten it. ' Don't talk to mo about iron ships, it's contrary to nature.

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