Battles of the British Navy, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Henry G. Bohn, 1852 - Great Britain
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Page 140 - I am going fast : — it will be all over with me soon. Come nearer to me. Let my dear Lady Hamilton have my hair, and all other things belonging to me.
Page 425 - As the Chesapeake appears now ready for sea, I request you will do me the favour to meet the Shannon with her, ship to ship, to try the fortune of our respective flags.
Page 425 - I entreat you, sir, not to imagine that I am urged by mere personal vanity to the wish of meeting the Chesapeake, or that I depend only upon your personal ambition for your acceding to this invitation : we have both nobler motives. You will feel it as a compliment if I say, that the result of our meeting may be the most grateful service I can render to my country ; and I doubt not that you, equally confident of success, will feel convinced that it is only...
Page 463 - And smiles on glorious fate. To live with fame The gods allow to many; but to die With equal lustre is a blessing Heaven Selects from all the choicest boons of fate. And with a sparing hand on few bestows.
Page 140 - I suppose, my Lord, Admiral Collingwood will now take upon himself the direction of affairs.
Page 33 - Lord Nelson has been commanded to spare Denmark when she no longer resists. The line of defence which covered her shores has struck to the British flag; but if the firing is continued on the part of Denmark, he must set on fire all the •prizes he has taken, without having the power of saving the men who have so nobly defended them. The brave Danes are the brothers and should never be the enemies of the English.
Page 425 - You will feel it as a compliment if I say, that the result of our meeting may be the most grateful service I can render to my country; and I doubt not that you, equally confident of success, will feel convinced, that it is only by repeated triumphs in even combats that your little navy can now hope to console your country, for the loss of that trade it can no longer protect.
Page 47 - Come cheer up my lads, 'tis to glory we steer ;' the military band of the garrison answering with ' Britons strike home.' The effect of this scene it is difficult to describe : Englishmen were proud of their country ; and foreigners, who beheld the scene, wished to be Englishmen. So general was the enthusiasm...
Page 517 - The four ships to windward, part of the Egyptian squadron, were allotted to the squadron of rear admiral de Rigny ; and those to leeward in the bight of the crescent, were to mark the stations of the whole Russian squadron ; the ships of their line closing those of the English line, and being followed up by their own frigates. The French frigate Armide...
Page 132 - I cannot help it, it does not signify which we run on board of. Go on board which you please: take your choice.

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