Dealing with Death: A Handbook of Practices, Procedures and Law

Front Cover
Jessica Kingsley Publishers, May 25, 2006 - Family & Relationships - 352 pages
0 Reviews
Dealing with Death is a comprehensive and authoritative source of information for professionals on the procedures, laws and cultural customs that should be observed when someone dies. This completely updated and expanded second edition takes into account the recent changes in UK law and the impact of the Harold Shipman and Alder Hey enquiries. Clear guidance is provided on all the legal, technical and forensic procedures surrounding death, including: * medical certification of cause of death * coroner's enquiries * autopsy * organ and tissue donation * burial and cremation * exhumation. The authors give insights into a wide range of sensitive areas, such as dignified care for the dying and considerations for the bereaved, the particular issues that arise when a baby dies, and the appropriate handling of death from AIDS. Part 3 provides an overview of a wide range of cultural and religious death rites and the implications of religious beliefs on blood transfusions, terminal care and euthanasia. This professional handbook is a key text for coroners, lawyers, police, funeral directors and clergy, as well as healthcare professionals, palliative care workers, social care professionals and students.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Considerations for the Living Care of the Dying and Death with Dignity
145
Religious Ethnic and Cultural Aspects of Dying and Death
215
APPENDIX A ORGANISATIONS WHICH MAY BE ABLE TO OFFER HELP WITH VARIOUS ASPECTS OF DYING AND DEATH
315
APPENDIX B SOURCES OF ADVICE ON FORENSIC PATHOLOGY
337
APPENDIX C FURTHER READING
340
SUBJECT INDEX
346
AUTHOR INDEX
352
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 2 - Talking With Children and Young People About Death and Dying A Workbook...

About the author (2006)

Jennifer Green is a retired consultant in public health, Wakefield Health Authority. She has also worked in anaesthetics, ophthalmology and general practice. Michael Green is Emeritus Professor of forensic pathology at the University of Sheffield. He was a Home Office pathologist and is now an independent consulting forensic pathologist.

Bibliographic information