The Architecture of Norman England

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Oxford University Press, 2002 - Architecture - 352 pages
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This important addition to the literature is the first overall study of the architecture of Norman England since Sir Alfred Clapham's English Romanesque Architecture after the Conquest (1934). Eric Fernie, a recognized authority on the subject, begins with an overview of the architecture of the period, paying special attention to the importance of the architectural evidence for an understanding of the Norman Conquest. The second part, the core of the book, is an examination of the buildings defined by their function, as castles, halls, and chamber blocks, cathedrals, abbeys, and collegiate churches, monastic buildings, parish churches, and palace chapels. The third part is a reference guide to the elements which make up the buildings, such as apses, passages, vaults, galleries, and decorative features, and the fourth offers an account of the processes by which they were planned and constructed. This book contains powerful new ideas that will affect the way in which we lookat and analyze these buildings.
  

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Contents

ENGLAND IO66 TO THE LATE TWELFTH CENTURY
20
CASTLES HALLS AND CHAMBER BLOCKS
49
CATHEDRAL MONASTIC AND COLLEGIATE CHURCHES
89
MONASTIC BUILDINGS
194
MINSTERS AND PARISH CHURCHES
208
ELEMENTS
247
PLANNING AND CONSTRUCTION
283
CONCLUSION
299
Methods
308
21
337
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Eric Fernie, CBE, BA, FSA, FRSE, is Director of the prestigious Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London (since 1995), and an OUP author

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