Medicine and Magic in Elizabethan London: Simon Forman: Astrologer, Alchemist, and Physician

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Oxford University Press, Feb 1, 2007 - History - 281 pages
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Simon Forman (1552-1611) is one of London's most infamous astrologers. He stood apart from the medical elite because he was not formally educated and because he represented, and boldly asserted, medical ideas that were antithetical to those held by most learned physicians. He survived the plague, was consulted thousands of times a year for medical and other questions, distilled strong waters made from beer, herbs, and sometimes chemical ingredients, pursued the philosopher's stonein experiments and ancient texts, and when he was fortunate spoke with angels. He wrote compulsively, documenting his life and protesting his expertise in thousands of pages of notes and treatises. This highly readable book provides the first full account of Forman's papers, makes sense of hisnotorious reputation, and vividly recovers the world of medicine and magic in Elizabethan London.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
I THE MAKING OF AN ASTROLOGERPHYSICIAN
15
II PLAGUE AND THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS OF LONDON
73
III THE CASEBOOKS
123
IV ALCHEMY MAGIC AND MEDICINE
171
Conclusion
227
Bibliography
233
Index of Manuscripts
259
General Index
263
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Lauren Kassell is a University Lecturer in the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Pembroke College.

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