Industrial Archaeology: Future Directions (Google eBook)

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Springer Science & Business Media, Jan 4, 2007 - Social Science - 334 pages
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The essays in this book are adapted from papers presented at the 24th Annual Conference of the Theoretical Archaeology Group, held at the University of Manchester, in December 2002. The session 'An Industrial Revolution? Future Directions for Industrial Archaeology,' was organised by the editors, and sponsored by English Heritage, with the intention of gathering together leading industrial and historical archaeologists from around the world. Industrial archaeology has emerged as a theoretically driven subfield. Research has begun to meaningfully engage with such issues as globalisation; power; innovation and invention; slavery and captivity; class, ethnic, and gender identities; social relations of technology and labour; and the spread of western capitalism. With an international group of authors, this volume highlights the current thought in industrial archaeology, as well as explores future theoretical and methodological directions. Industrial Archaeology: Future Directions will be of interest to historical and urban archaeologists, architectural historians, preservation agencies, archaeological consulting organizations, and cultural resource managers.
  

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Contents

New Directions
3
Beyond Machines
33
Constructing a Framework
59
AfterIndustrialArchaeology?
77
The Conservation of Industrial Monuments
94
Publishing and Priority in Industrial
121
The Conservation of Networked
135
Competing
155
Archaeologies of the Factory and Mine
174
Technological Innovation in the Early
205
Cultural Identity and the Consumption of Industry
243
The Industrial Archaeology of Entertainment
261
The Landscape
279
Revolutionizing Industrial Archaeology?
301
Index
315
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About the author (2007)

Eleanor Conlin Casella, senior lecturer in archaeology at the University of Manchester, is the coeditor of Industrial Archaeology: Future Directions and The Archaeology of Plural and Changing Identities.

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