What's the Use of Lectures?

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Intellect Books, 1998 - Psychology - 316 pages
1 Review
In one of the highest selling books on higher/further education to date, Bligh begins by arguing that lectures are most suitable for teaching information, not promoting thought or inspiring changes in attitudes.He goes on to detail the factors that affect the learning of information. The text is formed around a thorough consideration of the techniques of lecturing, including organization, how to make a point, use handouts, and obtain feedback, but it moves beyond lecturing to discuss alternatives when they are appropriate.
  

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I actually have the printed edition of this book, dated 1972. Owing to the critical reviews, I was tempted to open the book again. I'm glad I did
Table 8 shows a variety of teaching methods and
their best use. Only a small set is focused on 'imparting information' . Other primary objectives include Empathy, Problem Solving, Manual skills, Attitude change, 'Critical' thinking, Observation, Vocational skills and so on.
I think that it is a grave disservice to this book to say that it is only about imparting information. It is about far more than that.
Although the book is old, a surprising large % of it is still highly relevant today.
 

Contents

IV
6
V
10
VI
24
VII
31
VIII
32
IX
50
X
62
XI
69
XX
191
XXI
208
XXII
214
XXIII
222
XXIV
223
XXV
231
XXVI
250
XXVII
255

XII
70
XIII
89
XIV
110
XV
120
XVI
136
XVII
148
XVIII
156
XIX
165
XXVIII
256
XXIX
261
XXX
265
XXXI
267
XXXII
268
XXXIII
290
XXXIV
314
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Page 3 - ... What led me to the method was a dissatisfaction with the conventional lecture. Drawing on a variety of research studies Bligh convincingly demonstrates the limitations of the conventional lecture: 'Comparisons of the lecture method with other teaching methods . . . suggests that it ... cannot be used on its own to promote thought or to change and develop attitudes without variations in the usual lecture techniques

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About the author (1998)

Bligh is professor emeritus at Exeter University. A pioneer of university staff development, he joined London University's Teaching Methods Unit in 1970, and in 1980 became Chair of the Society for Research into Higher Education.

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