Ritual, Belief and the Dead in Early Modern Britain and Ireland

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Nov 22, 2010 - Social Science
0 Reviews
Drawing on archaeological, historical, theological, scientific and folkloric sources, Sarah Tarlow's interdisciplinary study examines belief as it relates to the dead body in early modern Britain and Ireland. From the theological discussion of bodily resurrection to the folkloric use of body parts as remedies, and from the judicial punishment of the corpse to the ceremonial interment of the social elite, this book discusses how seemingly incompatible beliefs about the dead body existed in parallel through this tumultuous period. This study, which is the first to incorporate archaeological evidence of early modern death and burial from across Britain and Ireland, addresses new questions about the materiality of death: what the dead body means, and how its physical substance could be attributed with sentience and even agency. It provides a sophisticated original interpretive framework for the growing quantities of archaeological and historical evidence about mortuary beliefs and practices in early modernity.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Religious Belief
19
Scientific Belief
59
Social Belief
103
Folk Belief
156
Conclusions
191
Index
221
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Sarah Tarlow is Senior Lecturer in Historical Archaeology at the School of Archaeology and Ancient History at the University of Leicester. She is the author of Bereavement and Commemoration: An Archaeology of Mortality (1999) and The Archaeology of Improvement (Cambridge University Press, 2007) and co-editor of The Familiar Past? Archaeologies of Later Historical Britain (1999) and Thinking through the Body (2002). She has published widely on archaeological theory, later historical archaeology, and the interdisciplinary study of death.

Bibliographic information