The Tented Field: A History of Cricket in America

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Popular Press, Jan 1, 1998 - Sports & Recreation - 280 pages
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This book attempts to answer this question, one of the most baffling, yet important, in the field of sports history. Based upon a thorough research of contemporary sources, from the colonial era up to the First World War, the author examines cricket's rise as an organized sport before the Civil War, its cultural rivalry with baseball during Reconstruction, and its attempt to find a niche as an alternative sport during the post-Reconstruction period. Cricket's role as a 19th-century school, college, and working-class sport is also analyzed, as well as its role in the sporting life of America's Victorian "underclass": women and minorities. From this research the author argues, as an alternative to widely accepted theories, that cricket failed as an American sport because it never established an American identity.
  

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The tented field: a history of cricket in America

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Cricket is not a game synonymous with North America. The only two books published on the game in the United States are by cricket player and teacher Melville. Far more than a chronological record ... Read full review

Contents

The Reluctant Tradition
5
The Beginnings
11
A Game a Sport but Not a National Institution
21
The AllEngland Tour of 1859 and the Insufficiency
43
The Retreat from Cosmopolitanism and the Fallacy
53
The Untenability of Elitism
73
A Place for Every Man Who Will Come and Take
93
Philadelphia and the Struggle
119
Conclusion
147
Photographs
159
Bibliographic Essay
209
Index
269
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