Legends of Devon (Google eBook)

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Page 54 - Captain proceeded, as he technically called it, to caulk the room ; to clode every hole and cranny, for the double purpose of confining the vapour, and prevent the egress of the spirit. The door was left a little on the jar, the vacant chair was placed opposite the host ; the spectre entered as usual ; serene, but rather inquisitive in its gaze upon the stranger. The rich curlew pie was served for supper, but no sooner was the plate placed before Sir Hugh, than as usual, the savoury viand...
Page 54 - ... looked more impatient than usual, but was silent ; supper was removed, the door closed, and abruptly fastened by the sailor, when, for the first time, the apparition perceived there was no avenue by which fresh air entered the room. (Spectres breathe only pure oxygen, without azote, while we mortals are compelled to inhale the mixed elements.) Two tubes were produced, the Indian weed ignited, and the whole room shortly enveloped in a noisome and dense atmosphere ; so thick was the smoke,...
Page 47 - Littleham ! it shall sit by thee in thy hall ! it shall meet thee in thy walks ! it shall draw the curtains of thy bed ! 'till thou shalt pray for the immortal Minstrels of Wythycombe to sing their requiem, to its disturbed and wandering nature.
Page 45 - ... his shield, was a memorial of such a grant ; but he never could fully establish it. Again, in the case of a wreck of a Genevese galliot, Sir Roger's men who were first on the spot, had secured a rich cargo of velvets for their master's use ; while Sir Hugh had obtained little else than sixteen jars of caviare, which, as it displeased his palate, had caused him to discharge his whole vocabulary of German invective on all around him. There were many other sources of discord. Sir Hugh's son furtively...
Page 45 - Hugh, indeed, claimed the whole as a royalty, and contended, that his bearing of three perriwinkles proper, in a canton, or, his shield, was a memorial of such a grant ; but he never could fully establish it. Again, in the case of a wreck of a Genevese galliot, Sir Roger's men who were first on the spot, had secured a rich cargo of velvets for their master's use ; while Sir Hugh had obtained little else than sixteen jars of caviare, which, as it displeased his palate, had caused him to discharge...
Page 48 - Arragon tolled out by its deep note, once only uttered, the death of a gothie monarch of Spain ; so the "Wythycombe monitor informed the affrighted peasant that a De Whalingham was no more ; and hence the ancient rhyme, "The bell of Wythycombe they say "Spontaneous tells the fatal day.
Page 53 - So much the better," quoth the Captain, " for the adage, (which is an old Spanish proverb,) hath it, that two of a trade can never agree." He then proceeded to describe the nature and properties of the American weed, which had for the first time been brought to Europe, by some of the returning companions of Columbus, and of which he had brought a considerable sample, in his own vessel, from Cadiz. The plan was laid and settled, and no sooner had the apparition taken its leave after the morning's...
Page 47 - Tears rolled on the neighbours rarely met a frown or a scowl alone marked any accidental reconnoitre, for no words ever again passed between them while in this mortal state. It was on a gloomy and gusty evening of December, that Sir Hugh, sitting in a doze, at ten at night, after the fatigues of a day's otter hunt, heard three deep and distinct tolls from the church bell at Wythycombe-Rawleigh, being about a mile and a half from Littleham.
Page 45 - ... case of a wreck of a Genevese galliot, Sir Roger's men who were first on the spot, had secured a rich cargo of velvets for their master's use ; while Sir Hugh had obtained little else than sixteen jars of caviare, which, as it displeased his palate, had caused him to discharge his whole vocabulary of German invective on all around him. There were many other sources of discord. Sir Hugh's son furtively entrapped herons in the marshes of Marlpool, rightfully belonging to the de "Whalinghams ; and...
Page 55 - T>y which Sir Hugh de Creveldt obtained remission from the sufferings he so long had endured. The habit once acquired, he continued whenever he could procure it, to indulge in smoking tobacco. It was the very last year of his life, 1563, that returning on a misty night, over...

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