The Georgian Era: Military and naval commanders. Judges and barristers. Physicians and surgeons (Google eBook)

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Vizetelly, Branston and Company, 1833 - Great Britain - 588 pages
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Page 355 - But how much nobler will be the sovereign's boast, when he shall have it to say, that he found law dear, and left it cheap ; found it a sealed book — left it a living letter ; found it the patrimony of the rich — left it the inheritance of the poor ; found it the two-edged sword of craft and oppression — left it the staff of honesty and the shield of innocence...
Page 295 - No one venerates the peerage more than I do, — but, my lords, I must say that the peerage solicited me, not I the peerage. Nay more,— I can say and will say, that as a peer of parliament, — as speaker of this right...
Page 77 - Before I sit down, I have one request to make to the house ; that when they come to decide upon my honour, they will not forget their own.
Page 62 - I stood near him ; and his face, to use the expression of the Scripture of the first martyr, ' his face was as if it had been the face of an angel.' I do not know how others feel, but if I had stood in that situation, I never would have exchanged it for all that kings in their profusion could bestow.
Page 229 - I am going fast; it will be all over with me soon. Come nearer to me. Let my dear Lady Hamilton have my hair and all other things belonging to me.
Page 227 - Foley," turning to the captain, "I have only one eye, — I have a right to be blind sometimes...
Page 277 - No man ever spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was lest he should make an end.
Page 424 - While the vaccine discovery was progressive, the joy I felt at the prospect before me of being the instrument destined to take away from the world one of its greatest calamities, blended with the fond hope of enjoying independence and domestic peace and happiness, was often so excessive that, in pursuing my favorite subject among the meadows, I have sometimes found myself in a kind of reverie. It is pleasant for me to recollect that these reflections always ended in devout acknowledgments to that...
Page 333 - In the court where we are now met, Cromwell twice sent a satirist on his tyranny to be convicted and punished as a libeller ; and in this court, almost in sight of the scaffold streaming with the blood of his sovereign, within hearing of the clash of his bayonets which drove out...
Page 50 - I shall make use of are too fatal to be eluded by the power of physic. If you think this of any consequence, you will not fail to meet...

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