Sudan

Front Cover
Bradt Travel Guides, 2005 - Travel - 262 pages
5 Reviews
Sudan is an emerging destination for adventurous travelers, and this new Bradt guide illustrates why it is such a compelling country to visit in its own right. Africa's largest nation, its varied land features include the Nubian desert, Nile plains, and several mountain ranges, while the fascinating city of Khartoum is a cultural melting pot that reflects its Egyptian, Islamic, and black African heritage.

The wide appeal of this first dedicated guide to Sudan will satisfy the needs of aid workers, ecotravelers, and those with diverse interests in topics such as archaeology, travel photography, hiking, and diving.

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Review: Sudan: The Bradt Travel Guide

User Review  - Miker - Goodreads

It's very out of date. So many things have changed since it was published. Even the newer version is now old since it was prior to the separation between the North and the South. I found more recent guidebooks on Sudan, even post July 2011. Read full review

Review: Sudan: The Bradt Travel Guide

User Review  - Kevin - Goodreads

This appears to be the first (and only) attempt at writing a guidebook for Sudan, and while it could use an update in light of the country's frequently evolving political and security situation, it is a solid enough work to help you land on your feet in Sudan. Read full review

Contents

PART
6
Chapter 7
49
Appendix I
73
Khartoum
99
communications 113 What to see and do in Khartoum
114
Shendi 125 Naqa 128 Musawwarat es Sufra 131
131
Karima 139 Nuri 143 El Kurru 144 Old Dongola 147
147
Travel along the Nile 153 Kerma 155 West Bank
164
The Red Sea
185
Kordofan
199
A warning 211 Background 212 Travel in Darfur
218
The civil war 223 Safety in the south
233
Language
249
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Paul Clammer works for an adventure-travel company leading tours to far-flung countries, and also runs a Web site dedicated to independent travel in Kabul. In 2002, he crossed Sudan overland as part of a trip following the Nile from its source in Ethiopia to the sea.

Bibliographic information