The History and Antiquities of Sunderland, Bishopwearmouth, Bishopwearmouth Panns, Burdon ...: From the Earliest Authentic Records Down to the Present Time (Google eBook)

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Page 305 - And though he were unsatisfied in getting (Which was a sin), yet in bestowing, madam, He was most princely. Ever witness for him Those twins of learning that he rais'd in you, Ipswich and Oxford ; one of which fell with him, Unwilling to outlive the good that did it; The other, though unfinished, yet so famous, So excellent in art, and still so rising, That Christendom shall ever speak his virtue.
Page 304 - Lofty, and sour, to them that lov'd him not; But, to those men that sought him, sweet as summer. And though he were unsatisfied in getting, (Which was a sin,) yet in bestowing, madam, He was most princely...
Page 44 - Justices did, under and by virtue of an Act of Parliament made and passed in the ninth year of the reign of his late Majesty King George the Fourth, intituled " An Act for the better regulation of Divisions in theseveral Counties of England and Wales," state their opinion that the following Parishes, Townships, and Places, would form together a.
Page 24 - Even the humorous Punch became serious and solemn under the pressure of this national loss, and sounded this requiem over the hero's grave : " HE is gone. Heaven's will is best : Indian turf o'erlies his breast. Ghoul in black, nor fool in gold Laid him in yon hallowed mould. Guarded to a soldier's grave By the bravest of the brave, He hath gained a nobler tomb Than in old Cathedral gloom. Nobler mourners paid the rite Than the crowd that craves a sight, England's banners o'er him waved Dead,...
Page 93 - was a man of a clear and ready apprehension, and a quick decision in business. He had too much heat, both of imagination and passion, and was apt to speak very freely both of persons and things.
Page 49 - Curate, in the said common perambulations, used heretofore in the days of rogations, at certain convenient places, shall admonish the people to give thanks to God, in the beholding of God's benefits, for the increase and abundance of his fruits upon the face of the earth, with the saying of the hundred and fourth Psalm, Benedic, anima mea, &c. At which time also the same Minister shall inculcate this and such like sentences, Cursed be he which translateth the bounds and doles of his neighbour...
Page 456 - March, march, dregs of all wickedness ! Glory that lower you can't be debased ; March, march, dunghills of blessedness! March and rejoice for you shall be raised Not to board, not to rope, But to faith and to hope ; Scotland's athirst for the truth to be taught her ; Her chosen virgin race, How they will grow in grace, Round as a neep, like calves for the slaughter ! III. March, march, scourges of heresy! Down with the kirk and its whilieballeery ! March, march ! down with supremacy And the kist...
Page 475 - An Ordinance of the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament for appointing the sale of Bishops' lands for the use of the Commonwealth,' be confirmed by Act of Parliament.
Page 23 - I called up the regiment to rise and advance ; without any other word from me, Lieutenant Havelock placed himself on his horse, in front of the centre of the 64th, opposite the muzzle of the gun. Major Stirling, commanding the regiment, was in front, dismounted, but the Lieutenant continued to move steadily on in front of the regiment at a foot pace, on his horse.
Page 455 - March, march, pinks of election ! Why the devil don't you march onward in order? March, march, dogs of redemption ! Ere the blue bonnets come over the border. You shall preach, you shall pray, You shall teach night and day; You shall prevail o'er the kirk gone a whoring ; Dance in blood to the knees, Blood of God's enemies ! The daughters of Scotland shall sing you to snoring.

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