All the King's Men

Front Cover
Harcourt, 2002 - Fiction - 656 pages
63 Reviews
Winner of the 1947 Pulitzer Prize, All the King's Men is one of the most famous and widely read works in American fiction. It traces the rise and fall of demagogue Willie Talos, a fictional Southern politician who resembles the real-life Huey "Kingfish" Long of Louisiana. Talos begins his career as an idealistic man of the people, but he soon becomes corrupted by success and caught in a lust for power. All the King's Men is as relevant today as it was fifty years ago.
Robert Penn Warren's masterpiece has been restored by literary scholar Noel Polk, whose work on the texts of William Faulkner has proved so important to American literature. Polk presents the novel as it was originally written, revealing even greater complexity and subtlety of character. All the King's Men is a landmark in letters.

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Review: All the King's Men: A Play

User Review  - John Freeman - Goodreads

Like a locomotive "All the King's Men" roared into my life, changed my view of the potential of fiction and burned the name Robert Penn Warren into my brain forever. A powerful story told in sparkling ... Read full review

Review: All the King's Men

User Review  - Mike Hart - Goodreads

Read this passage: A woman only laughs that way a few times in her life. A woman only laughs that way when something has touched her way down in the very quick of her being and the happiness just ... Read full review

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About the author (2002)

Robert Penn Warren (1905-1989), America's first Poet Laureate, won three Pulitzer Prizes and virtually every other major award given to American writers.

Noel Polk is a professor of American Literature at the University of Southern Mississippi and he lives in Hattiesburg, Mississippi.

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