Reporting in a Multimedia World

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Allen & Unwin, Jan 1, 2003 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 303 pages
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"This user-friendly introduction to basic journalism skills covers print, broadcast, and electronic media. Included are tips about the Internet, technology, video journalism, and photography. Also addressed are professional issues, career strategies, and generating story ideas. Case studies and tips from journalists in the field keep the book lively and relevant."
  

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Contents

The audience
13
The watchdogs
20
The raw material
29
News gathering
44
News writing style
149
Putting it all together
195
The changing reporting environment
221
The career path
272
References
293
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 27 - Rumour and unconfirmed reports, if published at all, should be identified as such. 4. News obtained by dishonest or unfair means, or the publication of which would involve a breach of confidence, should not be published unless there is an over-riding public interest. 5. A publication is justified in strongly advocating its own views on controversial topics provided that it treats its readers fairly by: making fact and opinion clearly distinguishable; not misrepresenting or suppressing relevant...
Page 27 - News obtained by dishonest or unfair means, or the publication of which would involve a breach of confidence, should not be published unless there is an overriding public interest. 1.10 In both news and comment, the press shall exercise exceptional care and consideration in matters involving the private lives and concerns of individuals, bearing in mind that any right to privacy may be overridden by a legitimate public interest.
Page 26 - ... publication; provided that this need not be done where the newspaper has reasonable grounds for believing that by doing so it would be prevented from publishing the report or where evidence might be destroyed or witnesses intimidated. 1.6 A publication should make amends for publishing information or comment that is found to be harmfully inaccurate by printing promptly, and with appropriate prominence, a retraction, correction or explanation.
Page 27 - ... public interest. 1.10 In both news and comment, the press shall exercise exceptional care and consideration in matters involving the private lives and concerns of individuals, bearing in mind that any right to privacy may be overridden by a legitimate public interest. 1.11 A newspaper has wide discretion in matters of taste but this does not justify lapses of taste so repugnant as to bring the freedom of the press into disrepute or be extremely offensive to the public.
Page 8 - The primary purpose of gathering and distributing news and opinion is to serve the general welfare by informing the people and enabling them to make judgments on the issues of the time.
Page 24 - Respect private grief and personal privacy. Journalists have the right to resist compulsion to intrude. 12 Do your utmost to achieve fair correction of errors. Guidance Clause Basic values often need interpretation, and sometimes come into conflict. Ethical journalism requires conscientious decision-making in context. Only substantial advancement of the public interest or risk of substantial harm to people allows any standard to be overridden.
Page 130 - States is even more acute in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks in the United States in 2001, in Madrid in 2004 and in London in 2005.
Page 26 - ... 1. Newspapers and magazines publications should not publish what they know or could reasonably be expected to know is false, or fail to take reasonable steps to check the accuracy of what they report. 2. A publication should make amends for publishing information that is found to be harmfully inaccurate by printing, promptly and with appropriate prominence, such retraction, correction, explanation or apology as will neutralise the damage so far as possible. 3. Readers of publications are entitled...
Page 254 - Avoid having any excess headroom (ie space between the top of the subject's head and the top of the frame).

References to this book

About the author (2003)

Roger Patching is course coordinator of journalism at Queensland University of Technology and co-author of Now the News in Detail. Mandy Oakham lectures in journalism at Deakin University and is editor of Don't Bury the Lead. Gail Sedorkin lectures in journalism at Deakin University and is co-author of Interviewing and Get Your Message Across. Barbara Alysen lectures in journalism at the University of Western Sydney and is author of The Electronic Reporter.

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