History of Scotland [1149-1603], Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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W. Tait, 1841 - Scotland
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Page 4 - At Sluys he heard that Alonzo, the king of Leon and Castile, was carrying on war with Osmyn, the Moorish governor of Granada. The religious mission which he had embraced, and the vows he had taken before leaving Scotland, induced Douglas to consider Alonzo's cause as a holy warfare ; and before proceeding to Jerusalem, he first determined to visit Spain, and to signalize his prowess against the Saracens. But his first field against the Infidels proved fatal to him who, in the long English war, had...
Page 355 - Every man possessed of a knight's fee was ordained to have for each fee a coat of mail, a helmet, a shield, and a lance...
Page 264 - Hence there is a necessary connection between the wages of labour and the prices of the necessaries of life; and though the demand for work, compared with its supply, must regulate wages within certain limits, that is, between the lowest point to which they can fall and the highest to which they can rise, the latter point depends upon the demand, the former upon the cost of maintaining the labourer and his...
Page 326 - At the fourth assault, the miners set fire to the chief tower on the keep, so that the smoke burst out, and the tower itself was cloven to that degree as to show visibly some broad...
Page 332 - Saracen works; which were afterwards by them imitated in the West : and they refined upon it every day, as they proceeded in building churches. The Italians (among which were yet some Greek refugees), and with them French, Germans, and Flemings, joined into a fraternity of architects; procuring papal bulls for their encouragement, and particular privileges : they styled themselves freemasons, and ranged from one nation to another as they found churches to be built (for very many in those ages...
Page 332 - ... building in hand, they made a camp of huts. A surveyor governed in chief; every tenth man was called a warden, and overlooked each nine; the gentlemen of the neighbourhood, either out of charity, or commutation of penance, gave the materials and carriages.
Page 174 - ... or by the villeyns and cottars, who were themselves, in frequent instances, as we shall immediately see, the property of the lord of the soil. Thus, by a similar process, which we find took place in England under the Normans, and which is very clearly to be traced in Domesday Book, the greater feudal barons were possessed not only of immense estates, embracing within them field and forest, river, lake, and mountain, but of numerous and flourishing...
Page 319 - ... draw-bridge, well made and strong, and a sufficiency of other defences. It had good walls, and good ditches filled to the edge with water ; and I believe there never was seen a castle more beautifully situated, for at once could be seen the Irish sea towards the west, and to the north a fine country...
Page 331 - Rome, and measures were taken to obviate the grievance. The Pope created several corporations of Roman and Italian architects and artisans, with high and exclusive privileges, especially with a power of settling the rates and prices of their labour by their own authority, and without being controlled by the municipal laws of the country where they worked. To the various northern countries, where the churches had fallen into a state of decay, were these artists deputed. In consequence of the exclusive...
Page 5 - The circumstances of his death were striking and characteristic. In an action near Theba, on the borders of Andalusia, the Moorish cavalry were defeated; and after their camp had been taken, Douglas, with his companions, engaged too eagerly in the pursuit, and being separated from the main body of the Spanish army, a strong division of the Moors rallied and surrounded them. The Scottish knight endeavoured to cut his way through the Infidels, and in all probability would have succeeded, had he not...

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