A First Course in General Relativity

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jan 31, 1985 - Science - 376 pages
11 Reviews
General relativity has become one of the central pillars of theoretical physics, with important applications in both astrophysics and high-energy particle physics, and no modern theoretical physicist's education should be regarded as complete without some study of the subject. This textbook, based on the author's own undergraduate teaching, develops general relativity and its associated mathematics from a minimum of prerequisites, leading to a physical understanding of the theory in some depth. It reinforces this understanding by making a detailed study of the theory's most important applications - neutron stars, black holes, gravitational waves, and cosmology - using the most up-to-date astronomical developments. The book is suitable for a one-year course for beginning graduate students or for undergraduates in physics who have studied special relativity, vector calculus, and electrostatics. Graduate students should be able to use the book selectively for half-year courses.
  

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Review: A First Course in General Relativity

User Review  - Dylan Muckerman - Goodreads

very good introduction to general relativity, i think. the introduction to tensors is especially great. i didn't read very much on gravitational radiation, and some of the later chapters were not as ... Read full review

Review: A First Course in General Relativity

User Review  - Matt Dodds - Goodreads

Well written from a mathematics viewpoint. Not 100% application but still a good text. Chapter 6 on Curved Manifolds was my favorite. Read full review

Contents

II
1
III
4
IV
5
V
6
VI
7
VII
10
VIII
15
IX
18
LIV
151
LV
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LVI
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LVIII
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LXI
176

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XCIX
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C
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CII
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346
CIV
359
CV
367
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 359 - The theory of separability of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation and its applications to general relativity.

References to this book

Modern Cosmology
Scott Dodelson
Limited preview - 2003
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About the author (1985)

Bernard Schutz has done research and teaching in general relativity and especially its applications in astronomy since 1970. He is an author of more than 170 publications, including three highly-regarded books published by Cambridge University Press: Geometrical Methods of Mathematical Physics, A First Course in General Relativity and Gravity From the Ground Up. Schutz currently specialises in gravitational wave research, studying the theory of potential sources and designing new methods for analysing the data from current and planned detectors. He is a member of most of the current large-scale gravitational wave projects: GEO600 (operated by the AEI), LIGO and LISA. Schutz is a Director of the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, also known as the Albert Einstein Institute (AEI), in Potsdam, Germany. He holds a part-time chair in Physics and Astronomy at Cardiff University, Wales, as well as honorary professorships at Potsdam and Hanover universities in Germany. Born and educated in the USA, he taught physics and astronomy for twenty years at Cardiff before moving to Germany. In 1998 he founded the open-access online journal Living Reviews in Relativity. In 2006 he was awarded the Amaldi Gold Medal of the Italian Society for Gravitation (SIGRAV). He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and of the Institute of Physics, and a member of the German Academy of Natural Sciences Leopoldina and of the Royal Society of Arts and Sciences Uppsala.

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