The New Military Humanism: Lessons from Kosovo

Front Cover
Pluto Press, 1999 - Humanitarian assistance - 199 pages
2 Reviews
'A powerful and convincing alternative framework for understanding the NATO war on Yugoslavia.' Edward S. Herman'Thank God for Noam Chomsky ... Ruthless in his analysis of Nato's lies, relentless in his emphasis on the parallels between Kosovo, Central America and Turkey, he believes that this year's bombardment of Serbia undermines what is left of international law.' Robert Fisk, The IndependentThe crisis in Kosovo has excited passion and visionary exaltation of a kind rarely witnessed. The events have been portrayed as a 'New Humanism', timed fortuitously with a new millennium, which will displace the crass and narrow interest politics of a mean-spirited past.But is this New Humanism guided by power interests or by humanitarian concern? Is the resort to force undertaken 'in the name of principles and values', as professed? Or are we witnessing something more crass and familiar?The New Military Humanism is Chomsky at his best: a brilliant and revealing analysis, offering lessons for us all and sounding a clear alarm which none should ignore.

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: The New Military Humanism

User Review  - Jeremy Hammond - Goodreads

Essential reading to understand the NATO bombing of Kosovo, particularly for how it documents that the bombing exacerbated the violence on the ground, creating the very humanitarian crisis that was then ex post facto used to justify it. Read full review

Review: The New Military Humanism

User Review  - Nick - Goodreads

A concise example of what Chomsky's politics are, this book seeks to uncover the actual events in Kosovo in order to compare it to the Us/Uk narrative of Nato intervention to stop genocide. Instead we ... Read full review

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1999)

Noam Chomsky was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on December 7, 1928. Son of a Russian emigrant who was a Hebrew scholar, Chomsky was exposed at a young age to the study of language and principles of grammar. During the 1940s, he began developing socialist political leanings through his encounters with the New York Jewish intellectual community. Chomsky received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, where he studied linguistics, mathematics, and philosophy. He conducted much of his research at Harvard University. In 1955, he began teaching at MIT, eventually holding the Ferrari P. Ward Chair of Modern Language and Linguistics. Today Chomsky is highly regarded as both one of America's most prominent linguists and most notorious social critics and political activists. His academic reputation began with the publication of Syntactic Structures in 1957. Within a decade, he became known as an outspoken intellectual opponent of the Vietnam War. Chomsky has written many books on the links between language, human creativity, and intelligence, including Language and Mind (1967) and Knowledge of Language: Its Nature, Origin, and Use (1985). He also has written dozens of political analyses, including Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media (1988), Chronicles of Dissent (1992), and The Prosperous Few and the Restless Many (1993).

Bibliographic information