Historical Record of the Thirty-fourth, Or the Cumberland Regiment of Foot: Containing an Account of the Formation of the Regiment in 1702, and of Its Subsequent Services to 1844 (Google eBook)

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Parker, Furnivall, and Parker, 1844 - 100 pages
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Page 35 - It was without question," says he, " the most decisive conquest we have made since the beginning of the war, and in no operation were the courage, steadiness, and perseverance of the British troops and the conduct of their leaders more conspicuous. The acquisition of this place united in itself all the advantages which can be acquired in war. It was a military advantage of the highest class. It was equal to the greatest naval victory by its effect on the enemy's marine, and in the plunder it equalled...
Page 28 - July 1st, 1751, a royal warrant was issued in which the King's or first colour of the regiment was directed to be the Great Union, the second colour to be of bright yellow silk, with the Union in the upper canton, and in the centre of the colour the rank of the regiment in gold Roman characters within a wreath of roses and thistles on the same stalk. The costume of the regiment at this period was most picturesque.
Page 31 - Thus did four regiments, and one company " of artillery, maintain the fort against such numbers of " the enemy by sea and land for such a length of time " as can, perhaps, scarcely be paralleled in history. The " terms on which the fort was at last surrendered by a *' handful of men, so distressed, so shattered, and so " neglected, remain a lasting monument to their honour."f * Beatson's Naval and Military Memoirs.
Page 52 - No praise of mine can do justice to their admirable conduct, the patience and good-will shown by all ranks during forced marches in the worst weather, their strict attention to the orders they received, the precision with which they moved to the attack, and their obedience to command during the action. In short, the manner in which every one has performed his duty, from the first commencement of the operations, merits my warmest thanks, and will not, I am sure, pass unobserved by your Lordship.
Page 31 - The noble and vigorous defence which the English " have made, having deserved all the marks of esteem and " veneration which every military man ought to show to " such actions, and Marshal Richelieu, being desirous " also to show to General Blakeney the regard due to " the defence he has made, grants to the garrison all the " honours of war they can enjoy under the circumstances " of going out for an embarkation ; to wit, firelock on " their shoulders, drums beating, colours flying, twenty " cartridges...
Page 38 - ... Lieutenant-General Burgoyne eventually became placed, assumed a desperate character ; their numbers were reduced to about 3500 men able to bear arms, they were environed by 16,000 Americans, their retreat cut off, and they were short of provisions. Under these accumulated difficulties they agreed to lay down their arms, on condition of being sent to England, and of not serving again in North America during the war. These conditions were, however, violated by the American Congress, and the troops...
Page 29 - ... Great Britain until the year 1754 1754, when it proceeded to the island of Minorca to relieve the thirty-third regiment, which returned to England. The island of Minorca, at which the KING'S OWN were stationed, and where they were eventually called upon to perform most arduous and trying services, is the second of the Balearic islands, situated in the Mediterranean near the coast of Spain. This island had fallen successively under the dominion of the Carthaginians, the Romans, the Vandals, the...
Page 25 - Lessines, and after taking part in several movements, it was encamped near Brussels. In the mean time, Charles Edward, eldest son of the Pretender, had arrived in Scotland; and being joined by a number of the Highland clans, he obtained possession of Edinburgh, and penetrated into England. This regiment was immediately ordered to return: it formed part of the army assembled at Newcastle, under Field-Marshal Wade; and was employed in several movements designed to cover Yorkshire : being formed...
Page 44 - ... which I dare say you will, before this reaches you, have heard of; it has been the most extraordinary event in the annals of India; say it is unprecedented. I commanded the district of Arcot; at fourteen miles distance stands Vellore, the strongest fortress in this part of India, and for that reason chosen for the residence of the captive princes of the race of Hyder and Tippoo, with the two hostages given up to Lord Cornwallis. On the morning of the 10th July, I was on horseback at my usual...

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