Hitler's Prisons: Legal Terror in Nazi Germany

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Yale University Press, 2004 - History - 538 pages
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State prisons played an indispensable part in the terror of the Third Reich, incarcerating many hundreds of thousands of men and women during the Nazi era. This important book illuminates the previously unknown world of Nazi prisons, their victims, and the judicial and penal officials who built and operated this system of brutal legal terror. Nikolaus Wachsmann describes the operation and function of legal terror in the Third Reich and brings Nazi prisons to life through the harrowing stories of individual inmates. Drawing on a vast array of archival materials, he traces the series of changes in prison policies and practice that led eventually to racial terror, brutal violence, slave labor, starvation, and mass killings. Wachsmann demonstrates that "ordinary" legal officials were ready collaborators who helped to turn courts and prisons into key components in the Nazi web of terror. And he concludes with a discussion of the whitewash of the Nazi legal system in postwar West Germany.
  

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Contents

VII
17
VIII
18
IX
22
X
27
XI
30
XII
36
XIII
46
XIV
54
XXXVI
218
XXXVII
227
XXXVIII
228
XXXIX
237
XL
248
XLI
257
XLII
258
XLIII
262

XV
65
XVI
67
XVII
68
XVIII
71
XIX
83
XX
101
XXI
112
XXII
113
XXIII
128
XXIV
139
XXV
149
XXVI
156
XXVII
165
XXIX
171
XXX
176
XXXI
184
XXXII
189
XXXIII
191
XXXIV
192
XXXV
208
XLIV
269
XLV
274
XLVI
284
XLVIII
299
XLIX
306
L
314
LI
319
LIII
323
LIV
331
LV
339
LVI
341
LVIII
347
LIX
356
LX
361
LXI
372
LXII
392
LXIII
404
LXIV
488
LXV
523
Copyright

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Page 4 - the Germans generally turned out to be proud and pleased that Hitler and his henchmen were putting away certain kinds of people who did not fit in, or who were regarded as "outsiders",

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About the author (2004)

Nikolaus Wachsmann is lecturer in modern history at the University of Sheffield.

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