American Historical Documents: 1000-1904 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
P. F. Collier & Son, 1910 - America - 491 pages
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Contents

I
5
II
22
III
29
V
47
VI
51
VII
62
VIII
63
IX
70
XXXI
267
XXXII
273
XXXIV
283
XXXV
286
XXXVI
296
XXXVII
299
XXXVIII
309
XXXIX
327

X
90
XIII
113
XIV
126
XVI
147
XVII
157
XVIII
160
XIX
166
XX
168
XXI
180
XXII
185
XXIII
192
XXV
212
XXVII
222
XXVIII
241
XXIX
246
XXX
250
XL
334
XLI
344
XLII
347
XLIII
441
XLIV
442
XLV
446
XLVI
447
XLVII
449
XLVIII
450
XLIX
453
L
459
LI
464
LIII
467
LIV
469
LV
478
Copyright

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Page 343 - I shall have the most solemn one to " preserve, protect, and defend it." I am loth to close. We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battle-field and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.
Page 198 - Person. (2) The Privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be suspended unless when in Cases of Rebellion or Invasion the public Safety may require it. (3) No Bill of Attainder or ex post facto Law shall be passed. (4) No Capitation, or other direct, tax shall be laid, unless in Proportion to the Census or Enumeration herein before directed to be taken.
Page 169 - ... treason, felony, or other high misdemeanor in any State, shall flee from justice, and be found in any of the United States, he shall upon demand of the Governor or Executive power, of the State from which he fled, be delivered up and removed to the State having jurisdiction of his offence. Full faith and credit shall be given in each of these States to the records, acts and judicial proceedings of the courts and magistrates of every other State.
Page 277 - Croix River to the highlands; along the said highlands which divide those rivers that empty themselves into the river St. Lawrence from those which fall into the Atlantic Ocean to the northwesternmost head of Connecticut River...
Page 468 - That the United States hereby disclaims any disposition or intention to exercise sovereignty, jurisdiction, or control over said island except for the pacification thereof, and asserts its determination, when that is accomplished, to leave the government and control of the island to its people.
Page 451 - If we shall suppose that American slavery is one of those offenses which, in the providence of God, must needs come, but which, having continued through his appointed time, he now wills to remove, and that he gives to both North and South this terrible war, as the woe due to those by whom the offense came, shall we discern therein any departure from those divine attributes which the believers in a living God always ascribe to him?
Page 296 - In the discussions to which this interest has given rise, and in the arrangements by which they may terminate, the occasion has been judged proper for asserting as a principle in which the rights and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers.
Page 275 - Comprehending all Islands within Twenty Leagues of any Part of the Shores of the United States, and lying between Lines to be drawn due East from the Points where the aforesaid Boundaries between Nova Scotia on the one Part, and East Florida on the other, shall respectively touch the Bay of Fundy, and the Atlantic Ocean ; excepting such Islands as now are, or heretofore have been, within the Limits of the said Province of Nova Scotia.
Page 204 - Rules and Regulations respecting the Territory or other Property belonging to the United States ; and nothing in this Constitution shall be so construed as to Prejudice any Claims of the United States, or of any particular State. SECTION 4. The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a Republican Form of...
Page 260 - Tis substantially true, that virtue or morality is a necessary spring of popular government. The rule indeed extends with more or less force to every species of Free Government. Who that is a sincere friend to it can look with indifference upon attempts to shake the foundation of the fabric?

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